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  • Kate Bartholomew

    Shoes: ca. 1941-1952, British, suede, leather. "The shoes bear the CC41 (civilian clothing) mark stamped on rationed, Utility clothing produced under wartime restrictions and austerity regulations. These restrictions, imposed from 1941, ensured no materials were wasted in the manufacture of clothing. Heels higher than 2 inches were considered unnecessary and, therefore, banned."

  • Charmaine Ezelyk

    1940s CC41 Shoes

  • Emma Sutterby

    CC41 shoes (Civilian Clothing - WW2 government approved).

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During WWII, fashion designer Norman Hartnell was subject to the government trading & rationing restrictions as everyone else; the number of buttons, fastenings & amount of embroideries were all rationed.Clients ordered clothes within the restrictions or had existing clothes altered. This also applied to The Queen, who appeared in her best possible clothes in bombed areas around the country. Hartnell received her endorsement to design elegant & innovative clothes conforming to strict rationing.

Callot Soeurs (French, active 1895–1937). Dress, Evening, ca. 1913. Designer: Madame Marie Gerber (French). French. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Mercedes de Acosta, 1954 (2009.300.1200) #reddress

Ensemble (Jacket and Dress) Ossie Clark (British, 1942–1996) Date: 1970–73 Culture: British Medium: synthetics

Dress with Spencer 1820, British, Made of silk and cotton (Gothic Regency)

Dress 1818, American, Made of cotton (Gothic Regency)~~~~~ By 1811 in Britain, influence of the Middle Ages, termed Gothic crept into dress styles debasing the pure classical lines. The bodice gained more shaping and could be panelled. It was not cut as tight and narrow as in the first decade of the century, so it made the shoulder line broader and the dress more comfortable to wear.

Evening Ensemble - c. 1943 - by Norman Hartnell (British, 1901-1979) - Silk

Mary Quant dress ca. 1968 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dress: ca. 1820, British, velvet and silk.