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Who were the Canaanites? There is little evidence available to enlighten archaeologists as to who exactly the Canaanites were, and what system of rulership they had. There have been no significant findings of alphabetic writing from the region during the Middle Bronze Age. The few cuneiform tablets that were found mostly hail from Tel Hazor, a site associated with Syrian culture. The Middle Bronze Age Palace in Area D-West at Tel Kabri [Credit: DigKabri 2009]

Significant Bronze Age city discovered in Northern Iraq. Excavating the eastern slope of the upper part of Bassetki, where several fragments of Assyrian cuneiform tablets were discovered [Credit: P. Pfälzner]

Enthroned deity Period: Late Bronze Age Date: ca. 14th–13th century B.C. Geography: Levant Culture: Canaanite

Figure of a seated goddess Period: Late Bronze Age Date: ca. 14th–13th century B.C. Geography: Syria-Levant Culture: Canaanite

Smiting weather god or warrior with horned headgear Period: Late Bronze Age Date: ca. 14th–13th century B.C. Geography: Levant Culture: Canaanite Medium: Bronze

Gonur Depe is a Bronze Age site in Turkmenistan, dating back to the first half of the second milennium BCE, contemporary to the Mesopotamian and Indus Valley civilizations. The first agricultural settlements in the Murgab River deltat appearred in the 7th millenium BCE. The area was later called Margush in old Iranian texts and Margiana by Greek authors. The area of Margiana was 3000 square km wide, it consisted of more than 70 oasis and 150 settlements.

MINOAN, HELLENISTIC, LATE BRONZE-AGE STAND -- Circa 1400 BCE -- Cyprus -- Exhibited at The British Museum, London

A grand piece of Hittite legacy has been uncovered in Sivas’ Yildizeli district, with a palace being the latest discovery at the “Kayalipinar Excavation Site”. Palace from Hittite era discovered in Sivas The newly discovered palace, estimated to have been built in 1500 B.C., has been classified as a protected site by local authorities in Sivas [Credit: Hurriyet]

Gonur Depe is a Bronze Age site in Turkmenistan, dating back to the first half of the second milennium BC, contemporary to the Mesopotamien and Indus Valley civilizations. The first agricultural settlements in the Murghab River delat apperared in the 7th millenium BC. The are was later called Margush in old Iranian texts and Margiana by greek authors. The area of Margiana was 3000 square km wide, it consisted of more than 70 oasis and 150 settlements.