These five transitions will work hard for you if you want to play with your readers’ emotions: (1) regrettably (2) fortunately (3) for instance (4) perhaps (5) ultimately. To find out more about the power of the fabulous-five transitions, follow this pin back to my blog. Find more tips at http://pinterest.com/elaseminars/  or click  the following link to have lessons delivered to your inbox: http://elaseminars.com/opt-in-1.htm

These five transitions will work hard for you if you want to play with your readers’ emotions: (1) regrettably (2) fortunately (3) for instance (4) perhaps (5) ultimately. To find out more about the power of the fabulous-five transitions, follow this pin back to my blog. Find more tips at http://pinterest.com/elaseminars/ or click the following link to have lessons delivered to your inbox: http://elaseminars.com/opt-in-1.htm

"In the 1920s, Ernest Hemingway’s colleagues bet him that he couldn’t write a complete story in just six words. They paid up. Hemingway is said to have considered it his best work."

"In the 1920s, Ernest Hemingway’s colleagues bet him that he couldn’t write a complete story in just six words. They paid up. Hemingway is said to have considered it his best work."

Among the proven techniques for improving test scores is regular exposure to skills that will be required for those tests. Daily exposure to language skills -- including skills of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar -- will build students' skills and increase test scores.

Among the proven techniques for improving test scores is regular exposure to skills that will be required for those tests. Daily exposure to language skills -- including skills of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar -- will build students' skills and increase test scores.

For Grammar Geeks: A Visual Map of the 15 Punctuation Marks

For Grammar Geeks: A Visual Map of the 15 Punctuation Marks

Here's an useful chart that summarises, very simply, how to use 15 punctuation marks, ordered by difficulty. This was created by Curtis Newbold who runs a blog called The Visual Communication Guy. Nice work, sir. Download the hi-res version here.

20 Common Grammar Mistakes. (Pin now, read later. I know I'm guilty of possibly every single one of these.)

20 Common Grammar Mistakes. (Pin now, read later. I know I'm guilty of possibly every single one of these.)

An emphatic word (e.g. Lies.) or phrase (e.g. No response.) is a type of sentence fragment writers use to dramatize fiction and nonfiction pieces. Your grade school English teacher may not approve, but examples of these rule-benders can be found in novels, newspapers and magazines (see full post). Find more tips at http://pinterest.com/elaseminars/ or have lessons delivered to your inbox by clicking http://elaseminars.com/opt-in-1.htm

Two Writing Tips You Won’t Find in Warriner’s English Grammar and Composition Handbook

An emphatic word (e.g. Lies.) or phrase (e.g. No response.) is a type of sentence fragment writers use to dramatize fiction and nonfiction pieces. Your grade school English teacher may not approve, but examples of these rule-benders can be found in novels, newspapers and magazines (see full post). Find more tips at http://pinterest.com/elaseminars/ or have lessons delivered to your inbox by clicking http://elaseminars.com/opt-in-1.htm

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