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  • Kristal James

    Very good blog on English history, if I do say so myself :)

  • Mark Davis

    King William I The Conqueror (1066-1087). House of Normandy. 25th great-grandfather to Queen Elizabeth II. Conquered England as the first Norman King. Completed the establishment of feudalism in England, compiling detailed records of land and property in the Domesday Book and kept the barons firmly under control. Died in Rouen after a fall from his horse and is buried in Caen, France. He was succeeded by his son William II. Generation 31 on family tree.

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