There’s more to see...
Come take a look at what else is here!
Visit site
  • Rachel Svoboda

    Three different photographs of Peter, a slave from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, ca. 1863. The scars are a result of a whipping by his overseer Artayou Carrier, who was subsequently fired by the master. It took two months to recover from the beating. These photographs were widely distributed in the North during the war. Also called "Gordon", Peter later enlisted in the United states military. Heartbreaking

  • Jan den Dekker

    Black History Month - Zimbio After beatings, many African Americans would end up disfigured. This photo claims to be of a slave having been beaten, the identical photo is in on this board as being a photo of a man in the Holocaust as the result of medical experiments, you decide which, if either photo, is accurate.

  • The Pink Chaos

    Scars of a whipped slave, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA, 2 April 1863. Original caption: “Overseer Artayou Carrier whipped me. I was two months in bed sore from the whipping. My master come after I was whipped; he discharged the overseer. The very words of poor Peter, taken as he sat for his picture.” Source: National Archives and Records Administration

  • Garrett Zorigian

    Northern propaganda in the American Civil War. A former slave showing keloid scars from whipping. This famous photo was distributed by abolitionists.[37]

  • artsy Chica

    In the American Civil War the Union Army created Black Units from Black freemen from Northern States & escaped slaves. After the Army took over Baton Rouge, La; slaves from surrounding areas volunteered for service. One such volunteer was the former slave, Peter (Slaves often had no last name). He posed for the War Photo Dept telling the photographer: "Overseer Artayou Carrier whipped me. I was two months in bed from the whipping. Picture taken April 2, 1863

Related Pins

FOLKS were sold some "BILL OF GOODS" - and they have loved it ever since! DONT JUST PIN! THINK, READ & LEARN!! …3 SLAVES??? Well, this was largely work of orphanages in the South seeking money from RICH WHITE DONORS in the North in the 1860s. Agencies used alot of mixed-breed Children in posters, and it seem to have worked quite well. Click image to see more of the great PR job!

"Rosa, A Slave Girl from New Orleans", 1863-64. In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners. Photographs of Charles Taylor, Rebecca Huger, Rosina Downs, and Augusta Broujey were mass-produced and sold as part of the campaign.

Rosa, Charley and Rebecca 1863, mixed race ancestry New Orleans.Historic Photographs Of "White" Slaves

Wilson, Charley, Rebecca & Rosa 1863. The 3 children are of mixed race ancestry. Historic Photographs Of "White" Slaves

Historic Photographs Of White Slaves. In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners.

Wilson Chinn, a branded slave from Louisiana, 1863.

Rebecca 1863 mixed race ancestry. Historic Photographs Of "White" Slaves

"Rebecca, A Slave Girl of New Orleans", 1863-64. In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners. Photographs of Charles Taylor, Rebecca Huger, Rosina Downs, and Augusta Broujey were mass-produced and sold as part of the campaign.

"'Oh! How I love the old flag.' Rebecca, A Slave Girl from New Orleans", 1863-64. In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners. Photographs of Charles Taylor, Rebecca Huger, Rosina Downs, and Augusta Broujey were mass-produced and sold as part of the campaign.

"Rebecca, an Emancipated Slave, from New Orleans", 1863-64. In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four children with mixed-race ancestry and pale complexions were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners. Photographs of Charles Taylor, Rebecca Huger, Rosina Downs, and Augusta Broujey were mass-produced and sold as part of the campaign.