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Brian Boru Harp now in Trinity College Dublin, does [The Brian Boru harp.] in fact not date from the time of Brian, but was made in 1220 for Donnchadh Cairbre O'Brien, King of Thomond, it had thirty metal strings. Throughout its history the harp was in the possession of of many people, some of whom were kings.

The Ishtar Gate, built by King Nebuchadnezzar was the eighth gate to the inner city of Babylon. The Ishtar Gate is one of the most wonderful exhibits in the famed Pergamon Museum in Berlin, Germany. The museum houses the world's most extraordinary collections of middle-eastern architectural archaeology.

The harp which is depicted on Ireland's coins. One of Ireland's national treasures it is kept at Trinity College in Dublin, along with the Book of Kells. It is also the harp upon which the Guinness Company designed their famous logo.

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What to do in Dublin: A Breath of Fresh Air

Top Dublin Sights - Things To Do In Dublin in 24 Hours - LOVE THIS!!! Might have to do this !

Antique Irish silver brooch in the form of the Irish harp. The harp is decorated with traditional Celtic motifs, in the traditional manner. The hallmarks are clear, except Hibernia who is only partially visible.

We Irish descend from the Milesians (also known as the Gaels) came to Ireland in 504 BC from Galicia. The common ancestor of all Irish people is Míl Espáine (from whence the Milesians are named), who was the king of Galicia and northern Portugal and it is rather interesting that Míl Espáine, in Gaelic, means Soldier of Hispania!

Based on the ancient folklore, the Irish harp is one of the world’s oldest instruments. The ancient Irish kings employed harpist to entertain them. At one sad point in Irish history conquering invaders made it illegal to posses an Irish harp and set out to burn every harp in Ireland in an attempt to kill the “Irish spirit”. Greatly honored, the harp is the national emblem of Ireland.

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Irish Harp ~ Based on the ancient lyre, the Irish harp is one of the world's oldest instruments. The ancient Irish kings employed harpist to entertain them. At one sad point in Irish history, conquering invaders made it illegal to posses an Irish harp and set out to burn every harp in Ireland in an attempt to kill the "Irish spirit". Greatly honored, the harp is the national emblem of Ireland.

"The Bell Of St. Patrick" -- 8th-9th Century -- This bell is reputed to have belonged to St. Patrick. It is made of two sheets of iron which are riveted together and coated with bronze. This bell is frequently mentioned in written sources as one of the principal relics of Ireland. -- National Museum of Ireland -- Dublin