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A lovely shot of the Veil nebula, an old supernova remnant, as seen by GALEX, a NASA mission designed to look at galaxies in the ultraviolet. See here: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/galex/pia15415.html

Gas, Dust & Stars

Gas, Dust & Stars

Gas, Dust & Stars

A real shooting star! Mira (MY-rah) is a star that scientists have studied for 400 years. But NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer telescope captured a very surprising image of Mira. It showed for the first time that Mira has a long tail of dust and gas—13 light-years long! That is 20,000 times longer than the average distance from the Sun to Pluto! Credit: NASA

NASA Gemini Mission Photos as iPhone Retina Wallpapers - Imgur

nebulas

nebulas

nebulas

Preview of a Forthcoming Supernova - NASA's Hubble Telescope captured an image of Eta Carinae. This image consists of ultraviolet and visible light images from the High Resolution Channel of Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys. The field of view is approximately 30 arcseconds across.

This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the nebula nicknamed "the Dragonfish." This turbulent region, jam-packed with stars, is home to some of the most luminous massive stars in our Milky Way galaxy. It is located approximately 30,000 light-years away in the Crux constellation.

NASAfrom NASA

Three-Billion-Mile Journey to Pluto Reaches Historic Encounter

Pluto nearly fills the frame in this image from the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) aboard NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, taken on July 13, 2015 when the spacecraft was 476,000 miles (768,000 kilometers) from the surface. This is the last and most detailed image sent to Earth before the spacecraft’s closest approach to Pluto on July 14.

THE CORE OF OUR GALAXY, seen in infrared light by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Blue light is from stars, green light is from polycyclic carbon molecules, yellow and red light is from the thermal glow of warm dust. This image spans approximately 1000 light years by 1600 light years. The galactic core is 26,000 light years away.