Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas

Alexandra David-Néel: Born in 1868 in Paris, by the time she was 18 she’d traveled around Europe & was a member of the Theosophical Society. When she was in her 40s she traveled to India to study Buddhism, met a prince, and possibly had an affair with him. During her travels in Asia, she lived in a cave, adopted a monk & traveled to Tibet at a time it was closed to foreigners. She met the 13th Dalai Lama which no European lady had ever done before. She died AT THE AGE OF 101 in 1969.

Florence Nightingale - founder of modern nursing. She came to prominence while serving as a nurse during the Crimean War, where she tended to wounded soldiers. She was dubbed "The Lady with the Lamp" after her habit of making rounds at night. Nightingale wrote Notes on Nursing (1859). The book served as the cornerstone of the curriculum at the Nightingale School and other nursing schools.

BuzzFeedfrom BuzzFeed

The 16 Most Delightfully British Photos Of All Time

A woman drinking tea during the Blitz. | The 16 Most Delightfully British Photos Of All Time

Hypatia- Philosopher, astronomer, mathematician, inventor of the astrolabe, advocate against religious repression and violence. Fearing her strong feminism, intellect, political power and influence, early christians stripped her naked, dragged her body through the street, and stoned her to death. The mob then burned her body along with the first university and largest library of the time. Most of her work has been lost; her discoveries would not be known again until 1200 years later.

Olive Oatman was "the first white tattooed woman in the history of the United States..." ~ Olive Oatman was 13 when she travelled from Illinois to California with her Mormon family. On the journey, the family were ambushed by a Native American tribe, who killed all but Olive, her Sister (who lated died of starvation) and her Brother (who escaped). After being sold to another tribe, as a slave, she was tattooed (tattoo) and taken in as "one of their own". She was 'rescued' 5 years later.

Once depicted as brutal, grunting, slouching sub-humans, Neanderthals are now known to have had brains as large as ours and their own distinct culture. They buried their dead, tended their sick and co-existed with our own ancestors in Europe for thousands of years before becoming extinct just as modern humans flourished and began to spread throughout the continent. This list looks at ten of the most persistent myths about Homo neanderthalensis.