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    Rothacker Childs Smith State of Birth: NY Home State: AL, Male, Black or African American War or Conflict: World War, 1939-1945 Status: Veteran Dates of Service: 1943-1945 EOS: Drafted Branch of Service: Army Unit of Service: 366th Infantry Regiment Location of Service: Southern Italy Prisoner of War: Yes Service History Note: Veteran served as a medic with an all Black infantry regiment. In 7/1944, the regiment was attached to the 92nd Division, and engaged in combat for the first time.

    Eugene Bullard: Acknowledged first African American military pilot, although he flew for the French flying service not the US Air Service. An American expatriate to France, Bullard was a hero of the Battle of Verdun before he began to fly for the French.

    Vintage African American photography courtesy of Black History Album, The Way We Were.

    Vintage Photograph African American

    African American Family

    William Matthews was so enthusiastic about the new First Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry in 1862 that he was one of the first to volunteer. Matthews’ enthusiasm spread and he convinced a number of exslaves to enlist in the regiment. The Leavenworth businessman soon was appointed captain, the highest ranking African American officer in the regiment.

    Macon Allen was the first African American to graduate was the first African American licensed to practice law in the United States, in Maine in 1844. He is also believed to be the first to hold a judicial position.

    Jacob Lawrence- Influential African American artist known for his "Migration" series

    African American c.1890

    “Stagecoach” Mary Fields (c. 1832-1914) was born a slave in Tennessee and following the Civil War, she moved to the pioneer community of Cascade, Montana. In 1895, when she was around 60 years old, Fields became the second woman and first African American carrier for the US Postal Service. Despite her age, she never missed a day of work in the ten years she carried the mail and earned the nickname “Stagecoach” for her reliability. Fields loved the job, despite the many...

    LaVern Baker (1960) // The first Black artist to file a legal grievance against white artists who produced pop covers of their hits. This reminds me of "Hair Spray" how there would be a "Black channel" and a "white channel" and most of the white music was stolen from the African Americans and produced to cater to the whites, and the original artists couldn't do a thing about it.

    1945 the late Alberta Martin, of Mount Airy (Philadelphia), African American nurse and World War II veteran.

    An African American schoolhouse, probably gone by now. So sad.

    Gordon Parks was the first African American photographer for LIFE magazine. A visual artist who captured the trials and joys of African Americans…He was the FIRST major African American director and is responsible for the ‘Learning Tree’ & the blaxploitation film ‘Shaft’…

    Young African American Young Man Cowboy

    Isaac Woodard Jr., African American World War 2 veteran decorated for courage under fire during service in the Pacific, is beaten by South Carolina police until he’s blind. He was declined the use of a toilet in South Carolina.

    Mary Edmonia Lewis (ca. July 4, 1845 – ca. 1911) was the first African American and Native American woman to gain fame and recognition as a sculptor in the international fine arts world. She was of African American, Haitian and Ojibwe descent.

    Today in Black History, 3/13/2014 - Anne Wiggins Brown was the first African American vocalist admitted to the Julliard School in 1928. For more info, check out today's blog!

    John Mercer Langston John Mercer Langston (1829�1897) was Virginia's first African American congressman, serving one term from 1879 to 1881. Born a free man in Louisa County, Langston received an education at Oberlin College in Ohio before he became president of Virginia Normal and Collegiate Institute (1885), which is today known as Virginia State University.

    +~+~ Antique Photograph ~+~+ African American Woman and former slave from Kentucky. Taken prior to 1915.

    Saint Elmo Brady (December 22, 1884 - December 25, 1966) was the first African American to obtain a Ph.D. degree in chemistry in the United States, which he earned in 1916 from the University of Illinois. He taught at Tuskegee, Fisk, Howard and Tougaloo, and was the first African American admitted to Phi Lambda Upsilon, the chemistry honor society. #TodayInBlackHistory