Robert Campbell moved to the United States and eventually became a fur trapper. This is his buckskin coat, ca. 1840.

Coat, American, early 19th C

Buckskin hunting shirt. Circa 1830;

Mountain Man OTTER fur Hat FCF Rendezvous POW WOW BUCKSKINNER Regalia Tanned

Luther S Kelly aka Yellowstone Kelly. 1849-1928 Well educated,expert rileman,trapper& hunter. Scout for army in Yellowstone river area.Guided 2 expeditions into alaska plus other major govermrnt expeditions. Agent for San Carlos Indian Reservation.

Image detail for -Hunting Coat, Delaware or Shawnee 1840's. Buckskin, silk ribbon. glass ...

Coat with Military Motif | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

It looks so warm!!!!!! SALE Cross Fox Fur Hat Buckskinner Mountain Man Rendezvous Reenactment or Ski Skiing VINTAGE PELT From 1908 on Etsy, $125.00

Mountain Men and Fur Trappers | Via Pop the Bear

buckskins clothes - Google Search

Man’s Coat Cree Métis, 1874 The National Museum of the American Indian

Mountain man bear

Cree Métis Coat front c. 1874; Red River,

THE LEGACY OF THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN: Native American Clothing (Plains Beaded Jacket / Frock Coat)

The Trapper

Pitching a tent the original way!

Stretching & Tanning of Hides & Skins, Photo of Fur Trapper with his Livlihood.

Fur Trappers Camp Google Image Result for http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-KDWRpJdsiao/Tz80YDB6mGI/AAAAAAAAFQ4/anXL5FlkPIE/s640/TRAPPER%27S%2BCAMP..jpg

Jim Baker 1818-1898. Trapper, scout & guide, was one of the west's most colorful figures. At 21 he headed for the annual rendezvous in the Rockies. In 1841 he was in a desperate fight on the Snake River when 35 trappers beat off a large band of Sioux. The decline of the fur trade in the 1840s drove many trappers to quit, but Baker stayed on. Little is known of his movements after 1844. He was chief scout at Ft. Laramie in 1855. In 1873 he was in Colo where he built a cabin with a guard tower...

Fur Trappers, Traders, Explorers, Scouts, these are the mountain men, of the Old West.

Ezra Meeker 1830-1928 Mountain man, Trapper, Guide, Before his death in 1928, just a few days shy of his 98th birthday, Ezra Meeker had not only walked the Oregon Trail several times, he'd ridden along it in an automobile and aboard a train, and flown over it in an airplane: he'd come a long way, and for many his story symbolized the opportunities that had been available on the frontier.