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Bill Viola, Tristian's Ascension, 2005. Color high-definition video on plasma display mounted on wall.

Welcome to the official BILL VIOLA website. Very interesting video artist.

"This world´s anguish is no different from the love we insist on holding back."- Aberjhani (Bill Viola)

The Banshee, from the Irish “bean sí” (“woman of the síde” or “woman of the fairy mounds”) is a female spirit in Irish folklore, usually seen as a harbinger of death, as well as a messenger from the Otherworld. In Irish legend, a banshee is a fairy woman who begins to wail if someone is about to die.

The banshee ( /ˈbænʃiː/ ban-shee), from the Irish bean sí [bʲæn ˈʃiː] ("woman of the sídhe" or "woman of the fairy mounds") is a feminine spirit in Irish mythology, usually seen as an omen of death and a messenger from the Otherworld. In legend, a banshee is a fairy woman who begins to wail if someone is about to die. In Scottish mythology the creature is called the bean sìth or bean-nighe and is seen washing the blood stained clothes or armour of those who are about to die.

The Bean-Nighe or "Washing Woman" is a type of Banshee who haunts the lonely streams of Ireland, washing the blood-stained garments of those about to die. It is said that these spirits are the ghosts of women who died in childbirth and that they are fated to perform their task until the day when they would have normally died.

Bill Viola, Incarnation, 2008, fotografia Kira Perov

In legend, a banshee is a fairy woman who begins to wail if someone is about to die. Banshees were said to appear for particular Irish families, though which families made it onto this list varied depending on who was telling the story. Stories of banshees were also prevalent in the West Highlands of Scotland. In Welsh folklore, a similar creature is known as the Hag of the mist.

Selkies (also known as silkies or selchies) are mythological creatures found in Faroese, Icelandic, Irish, and Scottish folklore. The word derives from earlier Scots selich, (from Old English seolh meaning seal). Selkies are said to live as seals in the sea but shed their skin to become human on land. The legend apparently originated on the Orkney and Shetland Islands.

Bill Viola Nou ja, niet echt blij, maar dit werk laat niemand onberoerd

Nikolai Kalmakov, Woman with Serpents