Discover and save creative ideas
    Visit site

    Related Pins

    Chief from the Blackfeet Teton band of the Lakota Sioux, later presiding as a Lakota chief. His warrior name was Ma-tow-a-tak-pe or Charging Bear and he fought at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

    american indians pictures - Bing Images Sioux Medicine Man

    Grandma Sioux, via Flickr. Pinned by indus® in honor of the indigenous people of North America who have influenced our indigenous medicine and spirituality by virtue of their being a member of a tribe from the Western Region through the Plains including the beginning of time until tomorrow.

    If the Great Spirit has desired me to be a white man he would have made me so in the first place. He put in your heart certain wishes and plans; in my heart he put other and different desires. Each man is good in the sight of the Great Spirit. It is not necessary for eagles to be crows. Now we are poor but we are free. No white man controls our footsteps. If we must die, we die defending our rights. --Sitting Bull - Teton Sioux

    Sioux/dakotas, espalhavam-se pelos estados de Dakota do Norte e do Sul, no centro-norte dos Estados Unidos. Eram os mais agressivos contra os brancos e tinham cerimônias que incluíam rituais de tortura como prova de bravura. Num desses rituais, mostrado no filme Um Homem Chamado Cavalo (1970), o índio tinha a pele atravessada por pinos de madeira presos a cordas, que eram estendidas para erguer o corpo até gerar dilacerações. Os sioux resistiram aos brancos até 1890, quando foram massacrados.

    Stella Yellow Shirt, Dakota Sioux, with baby, by Heyn Photo, 1899.

    Joseph Two Bulls, Dakota Sioux, by Heyn & Matzen Photo, 1900

    Sioux Indian Chief and Squaw by lacausey2000, via Flickr

    As a little child, it was instilled into me to be silent and reticent. This was one of the most important traits to form in the character of the Indian. As a hunter and warrior, it was considered absolutely necessary to him, and was thought to lay the foundations of patience and self-control. —Ohiyesa (1858 - 1939), Santee Sioux

    “The animals had rights - the right of a man’s protection, the right to live, the right to multiply, the right to freedom, and the right to man’s indebtedness - and in recognition of these rights the Lakota never enslaved an animal, and spared all life that was not needed for food and clothing.” - Chief Luther Standing Bear - Oglala Sioux