The Tawny Eagle (Aquila rapax) is a large bird of prey.  Like all eagles, it belongs to the family Accipitridae.   Photo Credit: Eric Jones

The Tawny Eagle (Aquila rapax) is a large bird of prey. Like all eagles, it belongs to the family Accipitridae. Photo Credit: Eric Jones

The Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas) is truly a champion of evolution.  Their ancestors were land dwellers, but they adapted to life in the Ocean some 150 million years ago.  These reptiles are so ancient, they were around to watch the Dinosaurs evolve and become extinct!  Photo Credit: Sven Liebchen

The Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas) is truly a champion of evolution. Their ancestors were land dwellers, but they adapted to life in the Ocean some 150 million years ago. These reptiles are so ancient, they were around to watch the Dinosaurs evolve and become extinct! Photo Credit: Sven Liebchen

These Two Koalas Fighting Resemble A Drunk Couple At The Club

These Two Angry Koalas Resemble A Drunk Couple In A Fight

These Two Koalas Fighting Resemble A Drunk Couple At The Club

The Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) is a tiny but long-legged owl found throughout open landscapes of North and South America. Burrowing Owls can be found in grasslands, rangelands, agricultural areas, deserts, or any other open dry area with low vegetation.[2] They nest and roost in burrows, such as those excavated by prairie dogs

Owls

The Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) is a tiny but long-legged owl found throughout open landscapes of North and South America. Burrowing Owls can be found in grasslands, rangelands, agricultural areas, deserts, or any other open dry area with low vegetation.[2] They nest and roost in burrows, such as those excavated by prairie dogs

A mosaic of four small photos of viverrids in trees

A mosaic of four small photos of viverrids in trees

Springbok often go into bouts of repeated high leaps (up to 13 feet) into the air in a practice known as "pronking" (the Afrikaans word pronk means to show off).

Springbok often go into bouts of repeated high leaps (up to 13 feet) into the air in a practice known as "pronking" (the Afrikaans word pronk means to show off).

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