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Poetry comes under the genre of creative writing but does that mean that the "rules" of ordinary grammar and spelling shouldn't be adhered to...

Poetry comes under the genre of creative writing but does that mean that the "rules" of ordinary grammar and spelling shouldn't be adhered to...

My love of poetry was incubated by my mother, whose love of poetry was lifelong, as it seems, my own poetic inclinations are and will be. Growing...

My love of poetry was incubated by my mother, whose love of poetry was lifelong, as it seems, my own poetic inclinations are and will be. Growing...

I love to read quotes on writing. That is why I have listed all my favorite ones right here. I enjoy reading what other people say about writing,...

I love to read quotes on writing. That is why I have listed all my favorite ones right here. I enjoy reading what other people say about writing,...

20 writing worksheets full of tips and ideas for planning your novel. #nanowrimo

20 writing worksheets full of tips and ideas for planning your novel. #nanowrimo

What is a writing prompt? It is a word, picture, phrase, quote or set of directions to help you kick start your writing for those days when you...

What is a writing prompt? It is a word, picture, phrase, quote or set of directions to help you kick start your writing for those days when you...

Add a little fun to your current novel or short story unit by turning your students into police officers. This official-looking offense/incident report requires students to collect details from their reading and use real-world writing skills to efficiently report the facts (just the facts, ma’am) of the scene you just read. Works with ANY piece of literature that has a crime or incident scene worthy of police attention. Works for 5th through 12th grade students. Check it out!

Add a little fun to your current novel or short story unit by turning your students into police officers. This official-looking offense/incident report requires students to collect details from their reading and use real-world writing skills to efficiently report the facts (just the facts, ma’am) of the scene you just read. Works with ANY piece of literature that has a crime or incident scene worthy of police attention. Works for 5th through 12th grade students. Check it out!

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