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    • Lisa Defibaugh

      Pathway of Hydrangeas - side yard?

    • Valli Weethee

      English formal garden

    • judith crawley

      Pictures of Formal English Gardens: A picturesque pathway of Hydrangea 'Tardiva' and Hydrangea 'Annabelle' resides on the south side of the property, situated under neighboring shady white pine trees. Design by Barry Block From DIYnetwork.com

    • Patricia Chambers

      Pictures of Formal English Gardens--Formal gardens feature straight lines, old brick, tall fountains and lots of color. Take a stroll through some of these beautiful landscapes...

    • Anne Smith

      English Country / Barry Block Landscape Design & Contracting, Inc.

    • Michelle Sanders

      row of white hydrangea - Google Search

    • Angela Nelson

      English Garden Ideas

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    Climbing Hydrangea. Yes, this is a slow grower as it doesn't really take off for about three years, but so worth the wait! It will grow in the shade too...an extra bonus if you have a shady stone wall or fence...or house!

    Hydrangea, SO excited to finally have these in my front yard!!! Always been a favorite of mine :)

    SPRING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! YOU MADE IT THROUGH THE WINTER - THANK YOU, JESUS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    and then i'll add these lush blue hydrangeas to the yard so you'll see plenty of red, white & blue!!

    My mother-in-law (a wonderful godly woman) would root her species Hydrangea by digging a shallow hole, laying a Hydragea branch in the hole (late spring/early summer), back-filling the hole with the dirt and placing a brick on top of the hole/branch. In the fall, the branch would have rooted into the soil just in time for a fall harvest to transplant. Miss you Bernice Moore!