Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas

Octavia E. Butler, science fiction writer. She was one of the best-known African-American women in the field, with works including the Patternist series (including Wild Seed), Lilith's Brood (formerly the Xenogenesis trilogy), and the Parable series. Her work was associated with Afrofuturism, where sci-fi parallels a marginalized, Black experience. She became the 1st science fiction writer to receive the MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant and was a recepient of Hugo and Nebula awards. R.I.P.

She is still known in history as Joanna the Mad (a.k.a, Joanna la Loca), but if you ask me, the history books have it wrong - Juana was not mad but was definitely betrayed by all the men in her life - her husband, her father, and then her own son. Born 1479, died 1555. And imprisoned for 47 years.

A little-known English nun who helped to hide Italian Jews from the Nazis in wartime Rome is being considered as a possible saint. Mother Ricarda Beauchamp Hambrough is credited with playing a vital role in saving the lives of more than 60 Jews by smuggling them into her convent.

Susie King Taylor: first African American army nurse; the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences; also the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia.

Sally Kristen Ride (born May 26, 1951) is an American #physicist and a former NASA #astronaut. Ride joined NASA in 1978, and in 1983 became the first American woman—and then-youngest #American, at 32—to enter #space. In 1987 she left #NASA to work at Stanford University's Center for International Security and Arms Control.

George Sand (1804-1876): writer, feminist, and muse for Chopin, Flaubert and Proust. Secondary to her more significant achievements, Sand caused scandal in Paris by wearing clothes traditionally intended for men and smoking tobacco. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Sand

St. Hildegard of Bingen: She did it all--woman religious, composer, author, playwright, mystic. Love her!

Pearl Buck (1892-1973), writer, civil rights activist, winner 1938 Nobel Prize in Literature. Born Hillsboro, West Virginia to missionary parents. Taken to China at 3 months old. Graduated Randolph-Macon Woman's College, Lynchburg, VA, Phi Beta Kappa, 1914. Masters from Cornell University in 1925. In 1949, outraged that existing adoption services considered Asian and mixed-race children unadoptable, Buck established Welcome House, Inc., the first international, interracial adoption agency.

Octavia Butler --- (June 22, 1947 – February 24, 2006) was an American science fiction writer. A recipient of both the Hugo and Nebula awards, Butler was one of the best-known African-American women in the field. In 1995, she became the first science fiction writer to receive the MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant.

During the Middle ages, and even in the Renaissance and until the 18th century, eyelashes were not styled. Women, in general, removed eyelashes and eyebrows in order to give more importance to the forehead, which was the most important feature in females’ faces at that time. Women were not supposed to exhibit their hair in public...(more at link.) image: Petrus Christus, Portrait of a Young Woman (detail), Netherlandish, c. 1470

William Shakespeare (Baptism April 26,1564; died April 23,1616) was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language, and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He enjoyed the Royal patronage of Elizabeth I. Painting now purported to be of Master William Shakespeare, known as the 'Cobbe portrait'.

In 1925, the National Geographic Society didn't admit women, so Harriet Chalmers Adams, adventurer and female badass, founded the Society of Woman Geographers. She was regarded as the foremost woman explorer of her time, traveling to Latin American, eventually writing about her travels for National Geographic magazine. She proved that women had the same moxie, the same adventurous spirit, and the same fortitude to see the world as any man! ~

HubPagesfrom HubPages

Florence Nightingale - Victorian Feminist and Medical Reformist

Florence Nightingale

SWEDEN: Elsa Andersson (1897-1922); Sweden’s first female aviator. Women we admire; influential women in history #Lottiedolls #herstory

Celebrate the life and times of Ann Petry (October 12, 1908 – April 28, 1997); an African American author who became the first black woman writer with book sales topping a million copies for her novel The Street.

Gertrude Ederle. First woman to swim the English Channel in 1926 (beating the men's record by one hour and 59 minutes!)

Joan Clarke Murray codebreaker at Bletchley Park during World War II, became deputy head of Hut 8 in 1944. Code breaking was almost exclusively done by men during the war. Clarke was paid less than the men and felt that she was prevented from progressing further because of her gender. She was a English cryptanalyst and numismatist ~