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Quite the fabric on the gal on the left

6-11-11  A replica of Mary Tudor’s wedding dress    A beautiful replica of Mary Tudor’s wedding dress. Made by costume expert Tanya Elliott.    Mary’s dress was recorded in one contemporary report to be in the French style and made of ‘rich tissue with a border and wide sleeves, embroidered upon purple satin, set with pearls of our store, lined with purple taffeta’. It had a partlet, the sleeveless jacket covering just the chest and a high collar. The kirtle was of white satin enriched with…

6-11-11 A replica of Mary Tudor’s wedding dress A beautiful replica of Mary Tudor’s wedding dress. Made by costume expert Tanya Elliott. Mary’s dress was recorded in one contemporary report to be in the French style and made of ‘rich tissue with a border and wide sleeves, embroidered upon purple satin, set with pearls of our store, lined with purple taffeta’. It had a partlet, the sleeveless jacket covering just the chest and a high collar. The kirtle was of white satin enriched with…

A richly elegant image of Edwardian actress Fannie Ward enjoying a spot of tea. #actress #vintage #Edwardian #Fannie_Ward #1900s #tea #elegant

A richly elegant image of Edwardian actress Fannie Ward enjoying a spot of tea. #actress #vintage #Edwardian #Fannie_Ward #1900s #tea #elegant

Dress (Robe à la Française)  Date: ca. 1750, European  (a) silk, metallic thread (b) silk, cotton (c) silk (d,e) metallic thread

Dress (Robe à la Française) Date: ca. 1750, European (a) silk, metallic thread (b) silk, cotton (c) silk (d,e) metallic thread

Metropolitan Museum of Art. Dated to last third of 18th C. Wool. European or American.

Metropolitan Museum of Art. Dated to last third of 18th C. Wool. European or American.

Originally an informal style, and banned for its informality from the French court by Louis XIV, the mantua gradually became acceptable as formal dress and remained a popular choice for court dress in England until the mid-century. Its popularity was such that dressmakers were referred to as mantua-makers.

Originally an informal style, and banned for its informality from the French court by Louis XIV, the mantua gradually became acceptable as formal dress and remained a popular choice for court dress in England until the mid-century. Its popularity was such that dressmakers were referred to as mantua-makers.

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