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    Photograph taken at the trial of Emmett Till by the infamous civil rights photographer, Ernest Withers who also doubled as a FBI Informant. Withers defied the judge’s orders prohibiting photography, documenting Till’s uncle Mose Wright identifying J.W. Milam, which “signified intimidation of Delta blacks was no longer as effective as the past,” and Wright “crossed a line that no one could remember a black man ever crossing in Mississippi.”

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    • Erika Grant

      Photograph taken at the Emmett Till murder trial by the infamous civil rights photographer, Ernest Withers who also doubled as a FBI Informant.

    • Johnny Anderson

      peopledontalwayssuck: Photograph taken at the trial of Emmett Till by the infamous civil rights photographer, Ernest Withers who also doub...

    • Gerry

      Photograph taken at the trial of Emmett Till by black photographer, Ernest Withers, who also doubled as a FBI Informant. Withers defied the judge’s orders prohibiting photography, documenting Till’s uncle Mose Wright identifying J.W. Milam, which “signified intimidation of Delta blacks was no longer as effective as the past,” and Wright “crossed a line that no one could remember a black man ever crossing in Mississippi.”

    • Animah Wahe

      The electric moment when Mose Wright “crossed a line that no one could remember a black man ever crossing in Mississippi” -- identifying J.W. Milam as one of the white men who had kidnapped and murdered his 14-year-old nephew Emmett Till (for the offense of whistling at a white woman). His testimony “signified that intimidation of Delta blacks was no longer as effective as in the past.” Photo taken covertly, by Ernest Withers, civil rights photographer who doubled as an FBI Informant.

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