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Women of Fauberg Treme, New Orleans and their dog. Faubourg Tremé is the oldest black neighborhood in America, and the origin of the southern civil rights movement and the birthplace of jazz.

"A Quartette of DUSKY BEAUTIES" London,1903. "Rhoda King, Jessie Ellis, Birdie Williams, Gigas performed in "In Dahomey," the first all black musical comedy, which came to the Shaftesbury Theatre from New York with a cast of over 100. It was a huge success, and its Cakewalk, and Buck and Wing dances became crazes in the UK.

Aida Overton Walker (14 February 1880 – 11 October 1914), also billed as "The Queen of the Cakewalk", was an African-American vaudeville performer. She appeared with her husband and his performing partner Bert Williams, and in groups such as Black Patti's Troubadours. She was also a solo dancer and choreographer for vaudeville shows.

Lois K. Alexander-Lane [b.1916 - d.2007] Lois Marie Kindle was a 1938 graduate of what is now Hampton University in Virginia. She was a charter member for the National Coalition of Negro Women

Black Girl with Long Hairfrom Black Girl with Long Hair

Kru People: The Africans Who Vigilantly Refused to Be Captured into Slavery

The Kru would fight vehemently and even take their own lives before surrendering to enslavement. Because of their tenacity, they were labeled as difficult and less valuable in the slave trade. Apart from their strength in resistance, the Kru were known for their ability to effortlessly navigate the seas.

Very interesting. "in 1966, Uhura was the first black woman as a main character on US TV who was not a servant. NBC refused to let Nichelle Nichols be a regular, claiming Deep South affiliates would be angered, so Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry hired her as a “day worker,” but included her in almost every episode. She actually made more money than any of the other actors through this workaround, but it was still a humiliating second-class status. The network people made life hard for…

George Junius Stinney, Jr., [b. 1929 - d. 1944] He was 14 yrs. 6mos. and 5 days old --- and the youngest person executed in the United States in the 20th Century, in a South Carolina prison more than sixty-six years ago. Guards walked a 14-year-old boy, bible tucked under his arm, to the electric chair. At 5' 1" and 95 pounds, the straps didn’t fit, and an electrode was too big for his leg. See flickr link for more details.

An African Princess Who Stood Unafraid Among Nazis. Her autobiography is a one-of-a-kind perspective of an educated, empowered, world-traveling daughter of a royal family, which no one wanted to publish until now.

"Joseph Laroche and Juliette Lafargue were an intershade couple aboard the Titanic. As the ship sank, Joseph stuffed his coat with money & jewelry, took his pregnant wife and children to the deck and managed to get them into a lifeboat. He gave the coat to his wife, and said: “Here, take this, you are going to need it. I’ll get another boat. God be with you. I’ll see you in New York.” Joseph died in the sinking. He was the only victim of African Descent on the Titanic."

Elsie Austin was an attorney and the first African American woman to receive a law degree from the University of Cincinnati in 1930.