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Spinning by Firelight - The Boyhood of George Washington Gray - Henry Ossawa Tanner - The Athenaeum

Spinning by Firelight - The Boyhood of George Washington Gray - Henry Ossawa Tanner - The Athenaeum

Naturalist painter Henry Ossawa Tanner was born and raised in Philadelphia in 1859. He studied art in his early 20s at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. He later moved to Paris (where he'd settle primarily for the rest of his life), soon getting accepted into French galleries and establishing his career. His career in America was propelled by an article Booker T. Washington wrote about him in 1899, setting him up for an established stateside career.

Naturalist painter Henry Ossawa Tanner was born and raised in Philadelphia in 1859. He studied art in his early 20s at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. He later moved to Paris (where he'd settle primarily for the rest of his life), soon getting accepted into French galleries and establishing his career. His career in America was propelled by an article Booker T. Washington wrote about him in 1899, setting him up for an established stateside career.

Henry Ossawa Tanner, "The Banjo Lesson".      Links to PBS.org introduction to his work.    "One of the first African-American artists to achieve a reputation in both America and Europe, Henry Ossawa Tanner worked in the Naturalist and genre traditions of American art. Though his work grew increasingly mainstream and allegorical, his early depictions of humble black folk about their daily lives are regarded as classic statements of African-American pride and dignity."

Henry Ossawa Tanner, "The Banjo Lesson". Links to PBS.org introduction to his work. "One of the first African-American artists to achieve a reputation in both America and Europe, Henry Ossawa Tanner worked in the Naturalist and genre traditions of American art. Though his work grew increasingly mainstream and allegorical, his early depictions of humble black folk about their daily lives are regarded as classic statements of African-American pride and dignity."

Bishop Benjamin Tucker Tanner. 1897.(Henry's father.) by Henry Ossawa Tanner. The Baltimore Museum of Art)

Bishop Benjamin Tucker Tanner. 1897.(Henry's father.) by Henry Ossawa Tanner. The Baltimore Museum of Art)

One of the first African-American artists to achieve a reputation in both America and Europe, Henry Ossawa Tanner worked in the Naturalist and genre traditions of American art.

One of the first African-American artists to achieve a reputation in both America and Europe, Henry Ossawa Tanner worked in the Naturalist and genre traditions of American art.

Edward Hicks (1780–1849). The Falls of Niagara, ca. 1825. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch, 1962 (62.256.3)

Edward Hicks (1780–1849). The Falls of Niagara, ca. 1825. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch, 1962 (62.256.3)

Henry Ossawa Tanner, The Banjo Lesson. One of America's first African American #artists to gain international acclaim.

Henry Ossawa Tanner, The Banjo Lesson. One of America's first African American #artists to gain international acclaim.

The Visitation (also known as Mary Visiting Elizabeth), by Henry Ossawa Tanner (c. 1909-1910), Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, oil on canvas.  (from The Athenaeum)

The Visitation (also known as Mary Visiting Elizabeth), by Henry Ossawa Tanner (c. 1909-1910), Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, oil on canvas. (from The Athenaeum)

One of the first African-American artists to achieve a reputation in both America and Europe, Henry Ossawa Tanner worked in the Naturalist and genre traditions of American art. Though his work grew increasingly mainstream and allegorical, his early depictions of humble black folk about their daily lives are regarded as classic statements of African-American pride and dignity.

One of the first African-American artists to achieve a reputation in both America and Europe, Henry Ossawa Tanner worked in the Naturalist and genre traditions of American art. Though his work grew increasingly mainstream and allegorical, his early depictions of humble black folk about their daily lives are regarded as classic statements of African-American pride and dignity.

Two Disciples at the Tomb Henry Ossawa Tanner (1905-1906) Art Institute of Chicago Painting - oil on canvas

Two Disciples at the Tomb Henry Ossawa Tanner (1905-1906) Art Institute of Chicago Painting - oil on canvas

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