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  • Still Blonde after all these YEARS

    "This tea gown, with its light corseting and bustle is a more fashionable adaptation of the Aesthetic style. This style of dress became particularly popular as at-home wear because it was both comfortable and appropriate for greeting visitors." 1885 Pink Vintage Dress, Pink Vintage Gowns Love Pink Vintage Dresses? Visit our Pinterest board: http://www.pinterest.com/stillblondeaaty/pink-vintage-dresses/

  • Carolyn Smith

    Dress (Tea Gown) Liberty of London  (British, founded 1875) Date: ca. 1885 Culture: British Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Designated Purchase Fund, 1986

  • Kita Inoru

    1885 British Tea gown at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York - From the curators' comments: "This tea gown, with its light corseting and bustle is a more fashionable adaptation of the Aesthetic style....With its simple adornment and pale colors, it stands in marked contrast to the heavily embellished, confining, vividly colored costumes of the day. This style of dress became particularly popular as at-home wear because it was both comfortable and appropriate for greeting visitors."

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Beige silk dress (front) by Liberty of London, British, ca. 1913. Label: "Liberty, London and Paris"

Dress Liberty of London  (British, founded 1875) Date: 1890s Culture: British Medium: silk, linen, cotton

Cape - Liberty & Co. (British, founded London, 1875)

Artistic dress had its roots in mid-Victorian England, where Pre-Raphaelite artists, with their love of things medieval, and disdain of industrialized society, revived a version of the loose fitting, relatively plain gowns of that time. This gown is a little more fashionable with its loose corset and a bustle.

Dress ca. 1910 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Tea Gown Liberty of London ca. 1885 This tea gown, with its light corseting and bustle is a more fashionable adaptation of the Aesthetic style. It is executed in the company's distinctive light and supple silks. With its simple adornment and pale colors, it stands in marked contrast to the heavily embellished, confining, vividly colored costumes of the day. This style of dress became particularly popular as at-home wear because it was both comfortable and appropriate for greeting visitors.

Ruched silk Artistic dress by Liberty of London, British, 1891. Label: "Liberty & Co./Artistic and Historic Costume Co./222 Regent St. W"

Victorian Clothes - Nainamo, BC museum by Ali Bear, via Flickr- I don't really like this, but felt obligated to include it , as it is vintage.

Evening gown, 1880s Attributed to Liberty of London (British, founded 1875) Yellow China silk

"Dress, pale purple, by Liberty & Co. (British, founded London, 1875) Date: 1890s Culture: British Medium: silk. Accession Number:1986.115.5"

Ivory wool tea gown with black silk velvet and black lace decoration (front), American, 1875. Worn by Amelia Beard Hollenback (1844-1918), wife of the prominent financier and philanthropist John Welles Hollenback (1835-1927), in the months immediately after the Hollenback's first daughter was born, this early example illustrates Amelia Hollenback's keen awareness of fashion. Teagowns, which were worn as at-home attire when entertaining guests, made their first appearance in the late 1870s.