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    • Anne Gresley

      Catherine de Valois. After Henry V's defeat of France, he married Catherine, daughter to Charles VI of France (also the younger sister of Isabella of Valois, Richard II's Queen). Catherine was the mother of Henry VI and, through her second marriage to Owen Tudor, the grandmother of King Henry VII.

    • Stephen Dawe-Kuta

      Catherine de Valois - Funeral Effigy

    • Ravenconscious

      Catherine Of Valois - English Monarch. Queen consort of King Henry V. The daughter of Charles VI the Wise of France and Isabelle of Bavaria, she married Henry as part of the settlement in the Treaty of Troyes. Theirs was a love match, and produced only one child, Henry. Following Henry V's sudden illness and death in 1422 Sir Owen Tudor, and the two were secretly married. They had four children, their sons would be the founders of the Tudor dynasty. Catherine died in childbirth

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    ~ Little Sarah Rector, a former slave, became one of the richest little girls in America in 1914. Rector had been born among the Creek Indians, as a descendant of slaves. As a result of an earlier land treaty from the government. Back in 1887, the government awarded the Creek minors children 160 acres of land, which passed to Rector after her parents' deaths. Though her land was thought to be useless, oil was discovered in its depths in 1914, when she was just 10 years old.

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    Researchers from the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification at the University of Dundee have discovered that 17 bodies thrown head first into a Norwich well in the 12th or 13th century were Jews, at least five of them from the same family.

    The Boston Molasses Disaster, also known as the Great Molasses Flood and the Great Boston Molasses Tragedy, occurred on January 15, 1919, in the North End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts in the United States. A large molasses storage tank burst, and a wave of molasses rushed through the streets at an estimated 35 mph (56 km/h), killing 21 and injuring 150. The event has entered local folklore, and residents claim that on hot summer days, the area still smells of molasses.

    Feodor Vassilyev (c. 1707[1]-1782) was a peasant from Shuya, Russia. His first wife, Mrs. Vassilyev sets the record for most children birthed by a single woman. She gave birth to a total of 69 children; however, few other details are known of her life, such as her date of birth or death. She gave birth to 16 pairs of twins, 7 sets of triplets and 4 sets of quadruplets between 1725 and 1765, in a total of 27 births. 67 of the 69 children born are said to have survived infancy

    Fabulous article! ~ From a 2006 Smithsonian article: Marie Antoinette, the teenage queen, now the subject of a movie, was embraced by France in 1770. Twenty-three years later, she lost her head to the guillotine. (But she never said, "Let them eat cake") Read more: www.smithsonianma...

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    The Cawood Sword is only the fifth sword of its type to be found and is by far the best preserved. It was discovered in the River Ouse, near Cawood Castle, North Yorkshire, in the late 1800s and its condition is so good that some strange wording can still be seen along its blade, ca. 1100.

    The Tollund Man is the naturally mummified corpse of a man who lived during the 4th century BC. He was found in 1950 buried in a peat bog on the Jutland Peninsula in Denmark, which preserved his body. Such a find is known as a bog body. The head and face were so well-preserved that he was mistaken at the time of discovery for a recent murder victim.

    James V, King of Scotland, Son of Margaret Tudor, father of Mary, Queen of Scots, nephew of Henry VIII