Posy ring with pictogram inscription, ‘Two hands, one heart, Till death us part.’ Made in England in the 17th century

Posy ring with pictogram inscription, ‘Two hands, one heart, Till death us part.’ Made in England in the 17th century

Seventeenth-century gold and enamel posy ring featuring a pair of hands holding two crowned hearts with the inscription 'Heart and Hand at your command'. ()rowanandrowan.com)

Seventeenth-century gold and enamel posy ring featuring a pair of hands holding two crowned hearts with the inscription 'Heart and Hand at your command'. ()rowanandrowan.com)

New, chainmail-like PaleoBarefoots claim to provide the same comfort and protection as other types of minimalist wear while making runners feel more connected to the ground.

Legit Barefoot Running Shoes That Are Made from Medieval Armor

New, chainmail-like PaleoBarefoots claim to provide the same comfort and protection as other types of minimalist wear while making runners feel more connected to the ground.

17th century gold posey ring....Inscribed..."In thee I finde content of mind".... Posey rings were given as a sign of love and affection with the inner message to be read only by the receiver.

17th century gold posey ring....Inscribed..."In thee I finde content of mind".... Posey rings were given as a sign of love and affection with the inner message to be read only by the receiver.

stacked rings: heart, skull, rose, L rune

Sterling silver ring with a custom stamped disc. Thick square band. Perfect as stacking rings. You choose design stamp. Gift under 50

A coffin collar was used to prevent grave robbers from stealing corpses. It was fixed round the neck of a corpse and bolted to the bottom of a coffin. This picture shows the back of a collar from Kingskettle in Fife. The collar dates from around 1820.  The iron collar is fixed to a piece of wood.  There was a widespread fear of grave robbers in the 18th and early 19th centuries. The demand for corpses was created by advances in the study of anatomy. Corpses were stolen and sold for…

A coffin collar was used to prevent grave robbers from stealing corpses. It was fixed round the neck of a corpse and bolted to the bottom of a coffin. This picture shows the back of a collar from Kingskettle in Fife. The collar dates from around 1820. The iron collar is fixed to a piece of wood. There was a widespread fear of grave robbers in the 18th and early 19th centuries. The demand for corpses was created by advances in the study of anatomy. Corpses were stolen and sold for…

17th century gold Poesy ring....ca. 1680....inscribed..."Your Freind Vnchangable".

17th century gold Poesy ring....ca. 1680....inscribed..."Your Freind Vnchangable".

Posey Ring "Virtue in thee is a crown to me", England, 18th or 19th century

Posy Ring "Virtue in thee is a crown to me"

‘Two hands, one heart, Till death us part.’ Made in England in the 17th century

‘Two hands, one heart, Till death us part.’ Made in England in the 17th century

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