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Two shaligrams, the round forms. In praise of day and night. Revealing the gaze of all manifestation—the pupils, energy itself in spiral form. Until the adept plants his own gaze there. His eyes in these eyes. (anonymous, near Samode, 1998)

From Tantra Song by Franck André Jamme The universal manifestation constantly evolving, growing, changing form. Modern physics does not contradict: energy is at the origin of this continuous swell. (anonymous, Bikaner, 1989)

ANONYMOUS: tantric painting (11–3); Legend: Dance of Energy; Samode, Rajasthan, 2008; unspecified paint on found paper; 13.75 x 9”

from Brain Pickings

Tantra Song: Rare 17th-Century Indian Paintings That Look Like 20th-Century Western Art

Tantra Song: Rare 17th-Century Indian Paintings That Look Like 20th-Century Western Art The three gunas, the “qualities” or conditions of existence, tamas, rajas and sattva: passivity of matter, active energy, and pure essence of things. (In Europe too, centuries ago, the black, red, and white were the three fundamental colors in alchemy.) Here, in the form of small candles, each has its own capacity to illuminate, even when one of these flames is black. (anonymous, Jodphur, 1995)

from T Magazine

17th-Century Modernism?

Tantric art, 17th c. Jamme says this painting is a meditation on "the endless dance of energy."

from T Magazine

17th-Century Modernism?

This painting represents the three gunas or conditions of existence, says Jamme. (In medieval Europe, he notes, black white and red were the three fundamental colors in alchemy.) "Here, in the form of small candles, each has its own capacity to illuminate."

from Brain Pickings

Tantra Song: Rare 17th-Century Indian Paintings That Look Like 20th-Century Western Art

Simply the king. The Shiva linga, the original representation of the deity. Sign among signs (in Sanskrit linga means “sign”). In the form of a man’s member joyful, erect, and sometimes so impassioned that, in the ritual, according to André Padoux, “it must be continually watered to cool it down.” A sacred thing among things, and always present in the temple, as well as in those small sanctuaries located in family estates, and in the intimate secrets of peoples’ homes.