Discover and save creative ideas
    Explore these ideas and more!

    Oooh, Nice! T cell shedding Friend murine leukemia viruses. Elizabeth R. Fischer and Kim J. Hasenkrug (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, MT)

    This human T cell (in blue) is under attack by HIV (in yellow), the virus that causes AIDS. The virus specifically targets T cells, which play a critical role in the body’s immune response against invaders like bacteria and viruses. eth Pincus, Elizabeth Fischer and Austin Athman, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

    After multiplying inside a host cell, the stringlike Ebola virus is emerging to infect more cells. Ebola is a rare, often fatal disease that occurs mainly in tropical regions of sub-Saharan Africa. Heinz Feldmann, Peter Jahrling, Elizabeth Fischer and Anita Mora, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

    High pressure inside some viruses allows them to blast their infectious DNA into human cells. Credit: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

    Google+Derya Unutmaz HIV attacking a human T cell This human T cell (blue) is under attack by HIV (yellow), the virus that causes AIDS. The virus specifically targets T cells, which play a critical role in the body's immune response against invaders like bacteria and viruses. Credit: Seth Pincus, Elizabeth Fischer and Austin Athman, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

    Fluorescence microscopy of the tongue. Image from the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging research, supported by the National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences. ncmir.ucsd.edu/...

    “The Black Death” usually invokes mental images of tolling church bells, doctors with beak-shaped masks, necrotic tissue, grave diggers, and the Middle Ages - but that’s far from the whole story. Meet Yersinia pestis: A Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium pictured here (in green) using scanning electron micrography on proventricular spines of a Xenopsylla cheopis flea (in purple). Image Credit: NIAID (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease).

    Symbiotic bacteria elaborate immunomodulatory molecules which are recognized by host immune cells (dendritic cells), and presented to T cells in order to mediate development of the mammalian immune system.

    Varicella zoster virus - chicken pox

    "Life: Magnified" is an exhibit of scientific images showing cells and other scenes of life magnified by as much as 50,000 times. The exhibit is on display at Washington Dulles International Airport’s Gateway Gallery from June through November 2014. The images are also available online with longer captions than in the airport exhibit at www.nigms.nih.gov....

    Bacteria being engulfed by an immune cell.

    Rob Kesseler

    This transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed numerous hepatitis virions, of an unknown strain of the organism. In the United States, viral hepatitis is an important public health problem because it causes serious illness, it affects millions, and it has a close connection with HIV. There are five identified types of viral hepatitis and each one is caused by a different virus. In the United States, hepatitis A, hepatitis B and hepatitis C are the most common types.

    fetus.

    MERS Health Advisory

    SEM of Staphylococcus epidermidis cluster embedded in exopolysaccharide matrix. The Gram-positive bacteria S. epidermidis and S. aureus are the most common pathogens in hospital-acquired infections. The more recent combination of extraordinary virulence and multiple antibiotic resistance in community-acquired methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus (CA-MRSA) poses an additional severe threat to public health.

    Scanning electron micrograph of a human neutrophil ingesting Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Bacteria

    Staphylococcus bacteria. Most common of the 1 trillion bacteria that live on our skin. Only a few strains of this bacteria are harmful and cause staph infections or toxic shock syndrome. Most are harmless.

    Meet lactobacillus!