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  • Kelly Frush

    Walnut Botanical Illustration

  • Zhuomei Wu

    Botanical drawing of walnut, flower, leaves and fruits

  • Shay

    Walnut antique botanical art print kitchen plants art garden wall art home decor wall art antique wall art kitchen wall art old prints

  • Tim Welting

    http://www.barefootherbalistmh.com/letters/attachments/File/Parasites.pdf Black Walnut Tree image from http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/w/walnut06-l.jpg

  • EJ B

    English Walnut Antique Botanical Print from Kohler's Medizinal Pflanzen circa 1883

  • Jose Birdine

    Walnuts walnut-house food

Related Pins

PECANS ON BURLAP America's love affair with pecans goes way back. In fact, back to a time before there even was an America. There's a lot more to pecans than pecan pie. For instance, pecan is actually an American Indian word that translates as "all nuts requiring a stone to crack." Because the nuts grew wild, pecans became a staple food for certain American Indian tribes.

PECANS Farmers use shaker to remove the nuts from the tree.

"We’re now recognizing that the mind, which is an energetic field of thought which you can read with EEG wires on your brain or with a new process called magnetoencephalography (MEG), which reads the field without even touching the body. So it basically says that when you’re processing with your brain, you’re broadcasting fields. " - Bruce Lipton

Matcha Granola With Blueberries, Walnuts, and Pecans — how great would this be atop a bowl of Greek yogurt?

Fun with food - what body part does this remind you of? Many times foods look like the parts of the body they benefit.

Foods That Look Like Body Parts They're Good For ~The folds and wrinkles of a walnut bring to mind another human organ: the brain. The shape of the nut even approximates the body part, looking like it has left and right hemispheres. And it's no surprise walnuts are nicknamed "brain food" Read more: Food Nutrition Facts - Healthy Living Tips at WomansDay.com - Woman's Day

A Walnut looks like a little brain, a left and right hemisphere, upper cerebrums and lower cerebellums. Even the wrinkles or folds on the nut are similar to those of the neo-cortex. Scientists claim that walnuts help in developing over three dozen neuron-transmitters within the brain enhancing the signaling and encouraging new messaging link between the brain cells. Walnuts help warding off dementia.

The Tunguska Explosion in Russia occurred around 7:14 a.m. on June 30, 1908. To this date, the exact cause of the explosion – which leveled 80 million trees over 830 square miles – remains a heated debate. Most believe it to be caused by a meteoroid fragment, others insist either a black hole or UFO origin.

Walnuts the nut that slightly resembles a brain is good for the brain. Particularly rich in omega-3 fatty acids, help brain cells to operate and carry a number of related benefits, including cardiovascular protection, protection against rheumatoid arthritis, bone-loss prevention, and protection against certain inflammatory skin diseases, such as eczema and psoriasis. They may also help to prevent gallstones, ward off and control high blood pressure, and protect against bone loss.

Atropa belladonna / Deadly nightshade. According to old legends, the plant belongs to the devil who goes about trimming and tending it in his leisure, and can only be diverted from its care on one night in the year, that is on Walpurgis, when he is preparing for the witches' sabbath.