The Castle of Fun greeted most visitors as they stepped off the trains (Near where Kiddieland is today). It was a fun house with slides, mirrors and moving barrels. Later it would become the Crazy Maze featuring Laughing Sal, a mechanical woman who laughed all day.

The Castle of Fun greeted most visitors as they stepped off the trains (Near where Kiddieland is today). It was a fun house with slides, mirrors and moving barrels. Later it would become the Crazy Maze featuring Laughing Sal, a mechanical woman who laughed all day.

The park Superintendent’s Office (L) with the original Dance Pavilion (R) at the intersection of Center St. and Park Ave in 1903. The Superintendent’s Office would later be replaced by a new Bowling Alley in for the 1906 season. The Dancing Pavilion (along with the Bowling Alley) would be destroyed in the massive December 1908 fire. Both were rebuilt in time for the next summer which you can read about here:http://on.fb.me/QUn2IF

The park Superintendent’s Office (L) with the original Dance Pavilion (R) at the intersection of Center St. and Park Ave in 1903. The Superintendent’s Office would later be replaced by a new Bowling Alley in for the 1906 season. The Dancing Pavilion (along with the Bowling Alley) would be destroyed in the massive December 1908 fire. Both were rebuilt in time for the next summer which you can read about here:http://on.fb.me/QUn2IF

The Castle of Fun. The postcard reads "Have just been through the Castle of Fun. Gee but it's great!" I bet it was. #amusementparks

The Castle of Fun. The postcard reads "Have just been through the Castle of Fun. Gee but it's great!" I bet it was. #amusementparks

July 4th historically was a big day for the park even when it was still known as Lynce's Landing. The "Conneautville Courier" reported in 1881 "The Fourth was the biggest day Conneaut Lake has ever known. Early in the day vehicles commenced pouring in at different landings and a pretty nearly stream was kept up about all day." Within a few years the crowds numbered near a few thousand, and as trains and trolleys began transporting visitors to the park those numbers only continued to grow.

July 4th historically was a big day for the park even when it was still known as Lynce's Landing. The "Conneautville Courier" reported in 1881 "The Fourth was the biggest day Conneaut Lake has ever known. Early in the day vehicles commenced pouring in at different landings and a pretty nearly stream was kept up about all day." Within a few years the crowds numbered near a few thousand, and as trains and trolleys began transporting visitors to the park those numbers only continued to grow.

I had to do a double take on this photo of the Boat House and Bathing Pavilion from around the mid 1910's. After straining my eyes and running over it with a magnifying glass, I'm pretty sure that's a bi-plane with pontoon landing gear. (I could be wrong.) A sea plane on the lake wouldn't have been a out of the question, though. Local aviation legend Earnest C Hall (of Warren Ohio) opened up a flight school with a Wright flying boat on Conneaut Lake in 1915.

I had to do a double take on this photo of the Boat House and Bathing Pavilion from around the mid 1910's. After straining my eyes and running over it with a magnifying glass, I'm pretty sure that's a bi-plane with pontoon landing gear. (I could be wrong.) A sea plane on the lake wouldn't have been a out of the question, though. Local aviation legend Earnest C Hall (of Warren Ohio) opened up a flight school with a Wright flying boat on Conneaut Lake in 1915.

The original bath house as it looked from the water. The caption to the 1904 booklet where this picture can be found reads, "The bathing of course is very popular. Nowhere can it be indulged in with less danger of more delight. No treacherous holes, no sharp descents, no undertow. The beach descends gradually so that ladies and children can wade to any desired depth with perfect safety. During the warm months hundreds may be seen splashing in the water or sunning themselves on the beach…

The original bath house as it looked from the water. The caption to the 1904 booklet where this picture can be found reads, "The bathing of course is very popular. Nowhere can it be indulged in with less danger of more delight. No treacherous holes, no sharp descents, no undertow. The beach descends gradually so that ladies and children can wade to any desired depth with perfect safety. During the warm months hundreds may be seen splashing in the water or sunning themselves on the beach…

This is Larry Palmer's souvenir shop, The Cozy Corner. It was located along the eastern end of Park Ave across from the Commons area. It was also among the buildings destroyed in the 1908 fire, but then was quickly rebuilt for the coming summer season. As you can see in the photo, The Cozy Corner sold burnt leather, post cards, ribbons, little boats, framed pictures, glass plates, and other assorted knick-knacks. Amazingly, some of these items still pop up today in online auctions.

This is Larry Palmer's souvenir shop, The Cozy Corner. It was located along the eastern end of Park Ave across from the Commons area. It was also among the buildings destroyed in the 1908 fire, but then was quickly rebuilt for the coming summer season. As you can see in the photo, The Cozy Corner sold burnt leather, post cards, ribbons, little boats, framed pictures, glass plates, and other assorted knick-knacks. Amazingly, some of these items still pop up today in online auctions.

Victoria Cottage (sometimes referred to as Victoria Inn and Victoria Hotel) was built in 1900 on the north side of Reed Road close to the intersection with Center St. Like most of the hotels at the, the two-story building had a large veranda, which in this case wrapped around the Victoria's four sides. It could accommodate 50 guests with rates at $1.50 per day. The Virginia was eventually torn down in 1959.

Victoria Cottage (sometimes referred to as Victoria Inn and Victoria Hotel) was built in 1900 on the north side of Reed Road close to the intersection with Center St. Like most of the hotels at the, the two-story building had a large veranda, which in this case wrapped around the Victoria's four sides. It could accommodate 50 guests with rates at $1.50 per day. The Virginia was eventually torn down in 1959.

Conneaut Lake Pennsylvania, Dance Pavilion at Exposition Park 1911

Conneaut Lake Pennsylvania, Dance Pavilion at Exposition Park 1911

Conneaut Lake Park 1906 Aerial View of Docks and Lake

Conneaut Lake Park 1906 Aerial View of Docks and Lake

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