Birth of Pandora | Greek vase painting

Thetis Silver-footed Thetis, disposer or "placer" (the one who places), is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of the ancient one of the seas with shape-shifting abilities who survives in the historical vestiges of most later Greek myths as Proteus (whose name suggests the "first", the "primordial" or the "firstborn"). [From Wikipedia]

Mokosh (aka Makosh). A goddess of fertility, water, and women in old #Slavic #mythology. According to folk belief she shears sheep and spins thread. The name itself is derived from the word combination maty kota ‘mother of the cat,’ that is, ‘mother of good fortune.’ She is related to All Mother Goddesses.

Nymphs & Daemones of Greek Mythology

Family Tree of the Greek Gods

The giants of Greek mythology, or Gigantes ("the earth-born") as they are called in the Greek tongue, were a class of oversized and ofttimes monstrous men who were closely related to the gods. The most famous of these were the hundred Thracian Gigantes who waged war on the gods, but there were many others besides, including the handsome giant Orion, the one-eyed Polyphemus, and the six-armed Gegenees.

Svarog * Svarog, Swaróg, Сварог, Schwayxtix, Swaróg in Slavic mythology, is the Slavic sun god and spirit of fire; his name means bright and clear. The name may be related to Sanskrit Svarga and Persian xwar (pron. Chvar) both meaning the same thing, indicating Indo-European etymological relation. So sacred was the fire that it was forbidden to shout or swear at it while it was being lit. Folklore portrays him as a fire serpent, a winged dragon that breathes fire. According to some interpret...

Gegenees from the Nurenburg Chronicle 1493

"Hermes - the messenger of Gods"Hermes was lighting fast in ancient Greek Mythology...

Greek Mythology Classical Texts

In Greek religion and mythology, Pan (Ancient Greek: Πᾶν, Pān) is the god of the wild, shepherds and flocks, nature, of mountain wilds, hunting and rustic music, and companion of the nymphs

Greek Mythology: Nike (or Nicé) was the winged goddess or spirit (daimon) of victory, both in battle and peaceful competition. When Zeus was gathering allies at the start of the Titan War, Styx brought her four children, Nike (Victory), Zelos (Rivalry), Kratos (Strength) and Bia (Force) into the service of the god. Nike was appointed his charioteer, and all four were appointed as sentinels standing beside the throne of the god. Beyond this Nike never acquired any distinctive mythology...

Greek Mythology: Ouranos (or Uranus) was the primeval god (protogenos) of the sky. The Greeks imagined the sky as a solid dome of brass, decorated with stars, whose edges descended to rest upon the outermost limits of the flat earth. Ouranos was the literal sky, just as his consort Gaia was the earth. Ouranos and Gaia fathered twelve sons and six daughters. The eldest of these--the giant Kyklopes and Hekatonkheires--he locked away inside the belly of Earth. Gaia suffered immense pain...

Jason & the Dragon | Greek vase painting

Greek Mythology: Nemesis was the goddess of indignation against, and retribution for, evil deeds and undeserved good fortune. She was a personification of the resentment aroused in men by those who commited crimes with apparent impunity, or who had inordinate good fortune. Nemesis directed human affairs in such a way as to maintain equilibrium. Her name means she who distributes or deals out. Happiness and unhappiness were measured out by her, care being taken that happiness was not...

Geryon, the three-bodied giant, battling Heracles | Athenian black figure amphora C6th B.C. | Musée du Louvre, Paris

Greek Mythology: Lyssa was the goddess or daimona (spirit) of rage, fury, raging madness, frenzy, and, in animals, of the madness of rabies. The Athenians spelt her name Lytta. Lyssa was a figure of Athenian tragedy. In Aeschylus she appears as the agent of Dionysos sent to drive the Minyades mad; and in Euripides she is sent by Hera to inflict Herakles. Greek vase-paintings of the period also confirm her appearance in plays about Aktaion, the hunter torn apart by his madenned hounds...

Three Fates by DividingME // www.dividingme.com

Triptolemus | Greek vase painting

Titan. Art by Cliff Childs.

Greek Mythology Picture Galleries