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    • bodacia

      Irene Sendler - Polish Roman Catholic nurse/social worker who served in the Polish Underground during World War II, and as head of children's section of Żegota, an underground resistance organization in German-occupied Warsaw. Assisted by two dozen other Żegota members, Sendler smuggled ~2,500 Jewish children out of the Warsaw Ghetto and then provided them with false identity documents and with housing outside the Ghetto, saving those children during the Holocaust. http://www.irenasendler.com/

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    • Marte Thiemann

      Irena Sendler 1910-2008 A 98 year-old German woman named Irena Sendler recently died. During WWII, Irena worked in the Warsaw Ghetto as a plumbing/sewer specialist. Irena smuggled Jewish children out; infants in the bottom of the tool box she carried and older children in a burlap sack she carried in the back of her truck. She also had a dog in the back that she trained to bark when the Nazi soldiers let her in and out of the ghetto. The soldiers wanted nothing to do with the dog, and the barking covered the kids’ and infants’ noises. Irena managed to smuggle out and save 2500 children. She eventually was caught, and the Nazis broke both her legs, arms and beat her severely. Irena kept a record of the names of all the kids she smuggled out and kept them in a glass jar buried under a tree in her backyard. After the war, she tried to locate any parents that may have survived and reunited some of the families. Most had been killed. She helped those children get placement into foster family homes or adopted. Last year Irena was up for the Nobel Peace Prize. She was not selected. Al Gore won- for a slide show on Global Warming.

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    Irena Sendler 1910-2008 A 98 year-old Polish woman named Irena Sendler recently died. During WWII, Irena worked in the Warsaw Ghetto as a plumbing/sewer specialist. Irena smuggled Jewish children out; infants in the bottom of the tool box she carried and older children in a burlap sack she carried in the back of her truck. She also had a dog in the back that she trained to bark when the Nazi soldiers let her in and out of the ghetto. The soldiers wanted nothing to do with the dog---face of love

    Irena Sendler. 1910-2008 A 98 year-old Polish woman named Irena Sendler recently died. During WWII, Irena worked in the Warsaw Ghetto as a plumbing/sewer specialist. Irena smuggled Jewish children out; infants in the bottom of the tool box she carried and older children in a burlap sack she carried in the back of her truck. She also had a dog in the back that she trained to bark when the Nazi soldiers let her in and out of the ghetto. The soldiers wanted nothing to do with the dog, and the barking covered the kids’ and infants’ noises. Irena managed to smuggle out and save 2500 children. She eventually was caught, and the Nazis broke both her legs, arms and beat her severely. Irena kept a record of the names of all the kids she smuggled out and kept them in a glass jar buried under a tree in her backyard. After the war, she tried to locate any parents that may have survived and reunited some of the families. Most had been killed. She helped those children get placement into foster family homes or adopted. Last year Irena was up for the Nobel Peace Prize. She was not selected. Al Gore won - for a slide show on Global Warming

    Irena Sendler was a Polish Catholic social worker. During World War II, she was a member of the Polish Underground and the Żegota Polish anti-Holocaust resistance in Warsaw. She helped save 2,500 Jewish children from the Warsaw Ghetto by providing them with false documents and sheltering them in individual and group children’s homes outside the ghetto. Despite being tortured and imprisoned by the Nazis, Sendler continued to do all she could to help Jewish children in Warsaw.

    during World War II Irena Sendler saved 2500 Jewish children by smuggling them out of the Warsaw Ghetto

    Jan Kostanski, a Polish teenager, assisted the Wierzbickis, a Jewish family he knew well as neighbors before the war. After German authorities confined the Wierzbickis in the Warsaw ghetto, Kostanski smuggled food to them. In this 1942 photo, Jan is entering the ghetto through a barbed-wire fence. When the Germans began deportations from the ghetto, Jan helped bring several members of the Wierzbicki family to safety on the “Aryan” side of Warsaw, where his mother found them hiding places.

    The Stroop Report was an album prepared by SS Major General Jürgen Stroop, commander of the German forces which liquidated the Warsaw ghetto, to document the suppression of the ghetto uprising in the spring of 1943.

    An emaciated Jew from the Lodz ghetto awaits deportation to the Chelmno death camp.

    Marie Curie -- certainly not on this board for being "forgotten" but I didn't know she was rejected from a university!

    During World War II more than 6 million Jews were killed in a genocide known as the Holocaust. Adolf Hitler, the leader of Germany and the Nazi Party, was bitterly anti-Semitic and blamed the Jews for Germany's problems. He developed the "Final Solution," a plan to isolate and kill the Jews. The Nazis sent Jewish prisoners to concentration camps throughout Europe. Some camps were killing centers; others were internment and forced-labor camps.