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Irena Sendler   To be able to enter the Ghetto legally, Irena managed to be issued a pass from Warsaws Epidemic Control Department and she visited the Ghetto daily, reestablished contacts and brought food, medicines and clothing. But 5,000 people were dying a month from starvation and disease in the Ghetto, and she decided to help the Jewish children to get out. For Irena Sendler, a young mother herself, persuading parents to part with their children was in itself a horrendous task. Finding…

Irena Sendler, a social worker who was part of the Polish underground during World War II and was arrested by the Nazis for saving the lives of nearly Jewish children by smuggling them out of the Warsaw ghetto.

Irena Sendler smuggled some 2,500 Jewish children out of the Warsaw Ghetto and then provided them with false identity documents and with housing outside the Ghetto, saving those children during the Holocaust.[5]

Irena Sendler smuggled some Jewish children out of the Warsaw Ghetto and then provided them with false identity documents and with housing outside the Ghetto, saving those children during the Holocaust.

Irena Sendler. Salvó a 2 500 niños del Gueto de Varsovia. Heroína de la 2a guerra mundial.

Muere Irena Sendler

Irena Sendler A 98 year-old Polish woman named Irena Sendler died in During WWII, Irena worked in the Warsaw Ghetto as a plumbing/sewer specialist. Irena smuggled Jewish children out

After 65 years... a brother and sister separated since the Holocaust were reunited in Israel. 78-year-old Binyamin Shilon believed for most of his life that his sister had been murdered by the Nazis, along with the rest of his family in Poland. 73-year-old Shoshana November, Shilon’s sister, had presumed him part of the six million Jews lost in the Holocaust, as well.

60 years after Holocaust, siblings reunited

After 65 years . a brother and sister separated since the Holocaust were reunited in Israel this week. Binyamin is 78 and Shilon is They had both survived the camps in Poland.

Holocaust survivor Henia Bryer:  Now in her 80s, she fears younger generations lack knowledge of the Holocaust.     "I had an operation once and the anaesthetist comes and looks at [the tattoo on] my arm and he says, 'What is this?' And I said, 'That's from Auschwitz.' And he said, 'Auschwitz, what was that?'  And that was a young man, a qualified doctor," she says.

Henia Bryer: Prisoner number A26188

Auschwitz, Poland, A torture device in the museum. "The Whipping Horse"

Auschwitz, Poland, A torture device in the museum. "The Whipping Horse"

Yep.

My Promise To My Children oh yes so true. I do so because you are my children. Love you both more than my own life. Some can only look from afar but I do not nor will I ever because I am your parent I am your dad.

This is Sigmund Sobolewski the 88th prisoner of Auschwitz. He arrived on the first train and survived for five years before the camp was lib...

This is Sigmund Sobolewski the 88th prisoner of Auschwitz. He arrived on the first train and survived for five years before the camp was liberated.

This is Sigmund Sobolewski the prisoner of Auschwitz. He arrived on the first train and survived for five years before the camp was lib.

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