Huldrych Zwingli as depicted by Hans Asper in an oil portrait from 1531 (Kunstmuseum Winterthur)

Huldrych Zwingli as depicted by Hans Asper in an oil portrait from 1531 (Kunstmuseum Winterthur)

Catherine Parr attributed to William Scrots, c.1545. (National Portrait Gallery, London)

Catherine Parr attributed to William Scrots, c.1545. (National Portrait Gallery, London)

Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester (1532-1588). Dudley's youth was overshadowed by the downfall of his family after his father, the Duke of Northumberland, had unsuccessfully tried to establish Lady Jane Grey on the English throne. Robert Dudley was condemned to death but pardoned by Mary I. He took part in the Battle of San Quentin (1557) under Philip II of Spain, which led to his full rehabilitation.

Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester (1532-1588). Dudley's youth was overshadowed by the downfall of his family after his father, the Duke of Northumberland, had unsuccessfully tried to establish Lady Jane Grey on the English throne. Robert Dudley was condemned to death but pardoned by Mary I. He took part in the Battle of San Quentin (1557) under Philip II of Spain, which led to his full rehabilitation.

Mary Boleyn, sister of Anne Boleyn | This portrait hangs in Hollyrood Palace, Edinburgh Scotland.

Mary Boleyn, sister of Anne Boleyn | This portrait hangs in Hollyrood Palace, Edinburgh Scotland.

Sketches by Hans Holbein the Younger Retronaut | Retronaut - See the past like you wouldn't believe.

Sketches by Hans Holbein the Younger Retronaut | Retronaut - See the past like you wouldn't believe.

On 9 September 1543 Mary Stuart, at nine months old, is crowned “Queen of Scots” in the central Scottish town of Stirling. She ruled Scotland for 25 tumultuous years, ending in 1567. At one time, she claimed the crowns of four nations - Scotland, France, England and Ireland. Her physical beauty and kind heart were acknowledged even by her enemies.

On 9 September 1543 Mary Stuart, at nine months old, is crowned “Queen of Scots” in the central Scottish town of Stirling. She ruled Scotland for 25 tumultuous years, ending in 1567. At one time, she claimed the crowns of four nations - Scotland, France, England and Ireland. Her physical beauty and kind heart were acknowledged even by her enemies.

Anna von Kleves, or Anne of Cleves (1515-1557) married Henry VIII in 1540 but was persuaded to accept an annulment that same year. She lived independently at Richmond & Bletchingley, properties granted to her in a generous settlement & was thereafter known as "the king’s sister." A false rumor circulated in 1541, that she’d given birth to a child. She remained involved with her former step-children & was present at many state occasions. When she died she was buried in Westminster Abbey.

Anna von Kleves, or Anne of Cleves (1515-1557) married Henry VIII in 1540 but was persuaded to accept an annulment that same year. She lived independently at Richmond & Bletchingley, properties granted to her in a generous settlement & was thereafter known as "the king’s sister." A false rumor circulated in 1541, that she’d given birth to a child. She remained involved with her former step-children & was present at many state occasions. When she died she was buried in Westminster Abbey.

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