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"The one thing you can’t take away from me is the way I choose to respond to what you do to me. The last of one’s freedoms is to choose one’s attitude in any given circumstance." — Viktor Emil Frankl

Viktor Emil Frankl M.D., Ph.D. (March 26, 1905, Leopoldstadt, Vienna – September 2, 1997, Vienna)[1] was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist as well as a Holocaust survivor. Frankl was the founder of logotherapy, which is a form of Existential Analysis, the "Third Viennese School of Psychotherapy". His best-selling book, Man's Search for Meaning (published under a different title in 1959: From Death-Camp to Existentialism, and originally published in 1946 as trotzdem Ja zum Leben sagen…

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30 Inspiring Quotes to Live By

When you're young, thunderstorms seem scary. Like the sky is angry at you. But now that I'm older, something about its roar soothes me; it's comforting to know that even nature needs to scream sometimes.

from Brain Pickings

Viktor Frankl on the Human Search for Meaning

Viktor Frankl on the Human Search for Meaning | Brain Pickings: "For Frankl, meaning came from three possible sources: purposeful work, love, and courage in the face of difficulty.'[E]verything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.'" #Philiosophy #Mans_Search_for_Meaning

from Lifehack

100 Inspirational Quotes That Summarize The Wisdom About Life

My rule of life: #1 "If you want something you never had, you have to do something you've never done."

from Brain Pickings

Viktor Frankl on the Art of Presence, the Soul-Stretching Capacity of Suffering, and How to Persevere in Troubled Times

Viktor Frankl (1905 –1997), Austrian neurologist, psychiatrist, and Holocaust survivor. His book, Man's Search for Meaning, chronicles his experiences as a concentration camp inmate which led him to discover the importance of finding meaning in all forms of existence, even the most sordid ones, and thus a reason to continue living. Frankl became one of the key figures in existential therapy and a prominent source of inspiration for humanistic psychologists.