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    • Elizabeth Shardelow

      German soldiers smoke captured American cigarettes in front of a U.S. Army armored car on December 17, the second day of Operation HERBSTNEBEL, the attack through Belgium and Luxembourg.

    • Jon Rice

      Poteau, Belgium - 18th Dec 1944. German troops taking a break, US armored scout vehicle in background.

    • Pentax

      This is the complete frame of one of the most famous stills from the German side in World War II. It is one of several taken (along with newsreel film) on December 18, 1944 near Poteau, Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge. The men are smoking captured American cigarettes, and they are part of the 1st SS Panzer Division, Kampfgruppe Hansen. The man on the left is holding an FN High Power pistol, and is draped in a 7.92mm MG42 ammunition belt. He has been wrongly identified as Walter Armbrusch.

    More from this board

    Obsolete M3A1 Light tanks sit in a U.S. Army depot, by Charles E. Steinheimer (1946)

    Surplus military motorcycles in England are bundled in groups of five to be sold as scrap, by William Vanderson (1946)

    B-24 Liberator bombers await further disassembly at Kingman Army Airfield, by Peter Stackpole for LIFE Magazine (1947)

    Engines are removed from mothballed B-17 bombers at Kingman Army Airfield, by Peter Stackpole for LIFE Magazine (1947)

    Soviet sniper Semen Nomokonov with his famous smoking pipe (1942). He was credited with 367 kills.

    "Retour des prisonniers", in Paris, by Willy Ronis (May 1945)

    P-51 Mustangs provide cover to a formation of B-17G Flying Fortresses. It's late enough in the war so the factory was no longer required to paint the wings or fuselage as aerial camouflage.

    CAVEAT: This is not a wartime picture. It is instead a modern re-enactment by Italy's Progetto 900. Its legend—visible above—is typically removed from the bottom of the image so that it can be incorrectly captioned "German soldier running through mud in city fighting", or the like.

    Dwight Eisenhower, Winston Churchill, and Omar Bradley firing new M1 carbines in England (1944)

    “The Impassioned Years: Partisans of Pskov”, by Semën Rotnitskiy (1944)

    W. T. Boston, Acting Town Crier and Saltbearer of the City of London, reads the war proclamation from the steps of the Royal Exchange in London (September 4, 1939).

    A German Winterhilfswerks postcard by Gottfried Klein reading "Es kann nur einer siegen und das sind wir" ("Only one can be victorious and that will be we"), based on a speech by Adolf Hitler on November 8, 1939. He was incorrect.

    "Be Mum—Spies Are Everywhere!" , by Marion Matchitt (1942)

    The issuance of dry rations to the the 347th Infantry Regiment of the 87th Infantry Division on the way to La Roche, Belgium (January 13, 1945). Note the soldiers' mess kits, the early-style M1 carbine, and a grenade on the collar of the soldier handing out the food. Via the National Archives, by Newhouse (Image 111-SC-198849)

    The issuance of dry rations to the the 347th Infantry Regiment of the 87th Infantry Division on the way to La Roche, Belgium (January 13, 1945). Note the soldiers' mess kits, the neck shawls reminiscent of the Germans at Stalingrad, the early M1 carbine, and a grenade on the collar of the soldier handing out the food. Via the National Archives, by Newhouse (Image 111-SC-198849)

    Japanese-American internees arrive by train from San Pedro at the Santa Anita assembly center, by Clam Aubers (April 5, 1942)

    Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt, and Josef Stalin at the Yalta Conference (February 11-15, 1945)

    Major Heinz “Pritzl” Bär and a Bf-109G ("Gustav") photographed on an airfield in Tunisia (April 1943). Hermann Göring's personal dislike of Bär, coupled with Bär's insubordinate character and lack of military discipline, deprived him of the diamonds to his Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. After World War II, he continued his career as an aviator, and he was killed in a flying accident on April, 28, 1957. Note his Afrika Corps wristwatch.

    1944. október. A 14 éves Willy Etschenberg és 10 éves Hubert Heinrichs az amerikaiak fogságában. A két fiút a bekerített Aachen belvárosában hagyták hátra orvlövészként.

    CAVEAT: This is a publicity still from the dramatic film AUSCHWITZ (2011), and not a genuine wartime image. Its composition and resolution are untypical of true period photographs. It is highly unlikely that the SS-men depicted would permit clear pictures of a war crime. Moreover, consider the unlikelihood of the photographer standing in the line of fire of the purported executioner’s pistol. Finally, the SS collar insignia look like reproductions.

    This is the full-frame view of the corpse of a Nazi official found in an underground shelter after the firebombing of Dresden (February 13-15, 1945). The picture was taken by Richard Peter, one of Dresden's most famous photographers. He also used a cropped version of the same picture in a composite image he called "Das letzte Lächeln des Wahnsinns" ("The Last Laugh of Madness").

    German troops resting. Note their MP40 submachine guns and spare magazines on the wall.

    A German 20mm anti-aircraft gun firing at ground targets on the Eastern Front (Summer 1941)

    German soldiers inspect a knocked-out Stuart tank.