Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas

August 1936. "People living in miserable poverty. Elm Grove, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma." Dorothea Lange.

"1909, family without father. All the children but the 4 smallest work in the cotton mill. Each child makes 4.50 a week."

July 1939. "Tobacco sharecropper's house. Rural rehabilitation clients. Whitfield family. Near Gordonton, North Carolina." negative by Dorothea Lange

An old homestead on a farm in Washington state, 1908. Notice the cat up on the beam of the log cabin. The guns, butter churn and spinning wheel reminds us of the self sufficient lifestyle of the first part of the last century.

This US soldier ‘found alive’ in Vietnam 44 years after being left behind.. I have read a lot of articles saying the United States left many...many, men over there. In prisoner of war camps. They were seen, it was known they were there and they simply got left.....abandoned.

Cancelled cheque in the amount of $ 7.2 million, for the purchase of Alaska from Russia, issued August 1, 1868. For less than 2 cents an acre, the United States acquired nearly 600,000 square miles.

Children gaze outward, just prior to their execution. At least one million children died in the Holocaust, most of them in the gas chambers. As the Germans swept into Soviet territory, they sometimes turned the task of killing Jewish children over to their Ukrainian allies. (Photo: Central State Archive of Film, Photo and Phonographic Documents / United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Photo Archive.)

August 1939. Migratory children living in "Ramblers Park." They have lived on the road for three years. Nine children in the family. Yakima Valley, Washington. Photograph by Dorothea Lange.

August 1939. Migratory children living in "Ramblers Park." They have lived on the road for three years. Nine children in the family. Yakima Valley, Washington.

The old Skagit River Hotel in Washington didn't offer a lot of amenities.

January 1939. "Herrin, Illinois. Family on relief living in shanty at city dump." Photo by Arthur Rothstein for the Resettlement Administration.

Washington, D.C., 1916. "Convention of former slaves. Annie Parram, age 104; Anna Angales, age 105; Elizabeth Berkeley, 125; Sadie Thompson, 110."