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The scary face in this image is actually inundated patches of shallow Lake Eyre (pronounced "air") in the desert country of northern South Australia. An ephemeral feature of this flat, parched landscape, Lake Eyre is Australia's largest lake when it's full. However in the last 150 years, it has filled completely only three times.

Clarín HDfrom Clarín HD

"Earth as Art"

2° lugar Yukon: La NASA nos presenta una colección de increíbles fotografías de nuestro planeta, tomadas desde satélites, en una colección llamada “Earth as Art“( Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/USGS)

Clarín HDfrom Clarín HD

"Earth as Art"

3er Lugar: Mississippi: NASA nos presenta una colección de increíbles fotografías de nuestro planeta, tomadas desde satélites, en una colección llamada “Earth as Art“( Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/USGS)

Clarín HDfrom Clarín HD

"Earth as Art"

4to Lugar: Argelia Landsat 5 Resumen Adquirida 04/08/1985: La NASA nos presenta una colección de increíbles fotografías de nuestro planeta, tomadas desde satélites, en una colección llamada “Earth as Art”. (Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/USGS)

City Lights Illuminate the Nile NASA image acquired October 13, 2012 The Nile River Valley and Delta comprise less than 5 percent of Egypt’s land area, but provide a home to roughly 97 percent of the country’s population. Nothing makes the location of human population clearer than the lights illuminating the valley and delta at night.

René-Levasseur Island in Quebec, the second largest island in the world located in a lake, formed in the crater from a meteorite collision - the 4th known largest impact in the history of the world - 214 million years ago. /

NASAfrom NASA

Chaos in Orion

Baby stars are creating chaos 1,500 light-years away in the cosmic cloud of the Orion Nebula. Four massive stars make up the bright yellow area in the center of this false-color image for NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

Inside the Cupola, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, the flight engineer of Expedition 36, uses a 400mm lens on a digital still camera to photograph a target of opportunity on Earth some 250 miles below him and the International Space Station. (June 3, 2013 -- credit: NASA Goddard)

TheMetaPicture.comfrom TheMetaPicture.com

What A View

Red Sea & Arabian Peninsula, Saudi Desert

The underlying image of the full disk of Earth and its clouds was taken on September 9, 1997, by a Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) operated by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and built by NASA. The ocean color data was collected in late September and early October 1997 by NASA's Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite.