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  • Alban Carmet

    Art Deco 1930 KJ Henderson Custom Motorcycle

  • Brian Chen

    1930 Art Deco Henderson Motorcycle :: This 100 mph (160 km/h) streamlined motorcycle was built in 1936 by O. Ray Courtney. It was based on the 1930 Henderson and the Art Deco style of the 20′s. The craftsmanship is absolutely stunning and it’s surely more of a museum piece than a daily rider. Frank has obviously spent an incredible amount of time meticulously restoring and rebuilding the bike to its current pristine state. More photos: http://chennibus.com/?p=2383

  • P.g. Mac

    Art deco inspired custom motorcycle based on a 1930 Henderson motorcycle

  • Samantha Strysko

    1930 Art Deco Henderson - something that would be cool if I actually motorcycled! #artdeco #motorcycle

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Henderson was a Chicago brand and one of the American ‘Big Three’ (with Harley-Davidson and Indian) until the onset of the Great Depression. It went bust in 1931.

1930 Henderson. I've always been fascinated with motorcycles but this take the cake. Its Art Deco in design and interesting cause all the mechanical are hidden. Unusual for a motorcycle.

Based on a 1930 K.J Henderson with an inline-4 air-cooled engine, all of the bodywork is custom and it’s the sort of thing that would have impressed even Ettore Bugatti. The Henderson Custom is owned and restored by Frank Westfall from Syracuse, New York. His first outing on the bike was to the Rhinebeck Grand National Meet in 2010.

From SS&C; in the UK An Amazing two wheel creation attributed to Bell&Ross; with a $4000 watch embedded into the tank

LOVE this motorcycle. Vehicle as art deco showpiece. - 1930 Henderson Custom

Cool streamlined style motorcycle. Henderson is a defunct brand of U.S.-made motorcycle that went bust around the time of the Great Depression. In 1936 designer O. Ray Courtney took a 1930 Henderson and modified it into this streamlined style

Indian aficionados, especially those of the 100-point concours persuasion, may want to click away from this page quick as you can—or at the very least, up your heart meds.