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USA. Alabama. Birmingham. 1963. Firemen turn high-powered hoses capable of stripping bark from trees against peaceful demonstrators, who are knocked down and skid across the grass in Kelly Ingram Park. By coming together and holding on to one another, they are able to stand up to the fire hoses. When they could no longer knock down the united protestors, the fireman turned off their hoses. (Bob Adelman)

USA. Alabama. Birmingham. 1963. Firemen turn high-powered hoses capable of stripping bark from trees against peaceful demonstrators, who are knocked down and skid across the grass in Kelly Ingram Park. By coming together and holding on to one another, they are able to stand up to the fire hoses. When they could no longer knock down the united protestors, the fireman turned off their hoses. (Bob Adelman)

Michael Donald - beaten and lynched 3/21/81 in Mobile, AL

Awesome Michael Donald, Last Noted African-American Man Lynched by the Ku Klux Klan:

Born in 1872, Wallace Rayfield, was a legendary craftsman who was the second in the nation to be licensed and the first black architect in Alabama. He worked alongside Robert Taylor, the first licensed black architect in history, when the two of them taught at Tuskegee Institute under Booker T. Washington.    Rayfield’s work as an architect consisted of designing the most significant buildings in civil rights history including 16th Street Baptist Church, Ebenezer Baptist Church

Wallace Augustus Rayfield (born March 1873 in Bibb County, Georgia; died February 1941 in Birmingham) was the second formally-educated practicing African American architect in the United States.

James Baldwin, Joan Baez, James Forman marching in Montgomery, Alabama 1965.

James Baldwin, Joan Baez, and James Forman (left to right) enter Montgomery, Alabama on the Selma to Montgomery march for voting rights,

This Day In History - November 5: Shirley Chisholm Becomes The First Black Congresswoman - 1968

1968: Shirley Chisholm Becomes The First Black Congresswoman

"I want history 2 remember me not just as th black woman elected 2 Congress, not as th black woman made a bid fr th presidency o/t US, but as a black woman who lived in th c & dared herself" Shirley Chisholm 1968

"Inter-racial Marriage Club of Washington, D.C. Naturally Wants Freedom Now"  "My home is desegregated. It's good."  Members of the Interracial Marriage Club are shown here protesting bans on interracial unions and advocating for desegregated homes.  Source: National Archives, Records of the United States Information Agency

"Inter-racial Marriage Club of Washington, D. Naturally Wants Freedom Now" "My home is desegregated." Members of the Interracial Marriage Club are shown here protesting bans on interracial unions and advocating for desegregated homes.

At 10:22 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 19, 1963, as families arrived to attend services at the church, a thunderous explosion rang out from the basement. 19 sticks of dynamite were planted in the basement of the 16th Street Baptist Church. The blast killed 4 little girls & injured dozens more.Despite a national outcry for justice, - Birmingham, was a place where 50 other racially motivated bombings had gone unsolved over recent decades.

The big break in the 16th St. Baptist Church bombing case

Birmingham~ Bombing of Street Baptist Church killed 4 girls.and years later, justice a long time in coming.

Jaylen Bledsoe, 15 started his own tech company at age 12. Bledsoe Technologies, is now worth an estimated $3.5 million. Jaylen says he plans to attend Harvard after he finishes high school.

Jaylen Bledsoe, 15 started his own tech company at age Bledsoe Technologies…

Birmingham 1963: How a Photograph Rallied Civil Rights Support More

Birmingham 1963: How a Photograph Rallied Civil Rights Support

Birmingham How a Photograph Rallied Civil Rights Support by Shelley Tougas Nonfiction J TOU

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