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Perseus Cluster’s X-Ray Skull. [Credit: A. Fabian (IoA Cambridge) et al., NASA] Although it looks like something in torment, it’s just an X-Ray image of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies. It doesn’t show the galaxies, only the X-rays given out by the gas between the galaxies. Mona Evans, "Cosmic Halloween Tour" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art52161.asp

Baby stars are forming near the eastern rim of the cosmic cloud Perseus in this infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The baby stars are approximately three million years old and are shown as reddish-pink dots to the right of the image.

TIME.comfrom TIME.com

It's Always 4th of July in the Universe

This looks more like a threatening ghost than either the dear old Horsehead Nebula or anything to do with the Fourth! But it's a Hubble Space Telescope infrared image of the Horsehead Nebula. (Credit: STScI/AURA/ESA/NASA) Mona Evans, "Cosmic Halloween Tour" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art52161.asp

Little Ghost Nebula. (NGC 6369) (Credit: Hubble Heritage Team, NASA) A planetary nebula in the constellation Ophiucus over 2000 light years away. William Herschel discovered it in the18th century. It's round like a planet, but was actually formed from material ejected by a dying star. What remains of the star is the white dwarf near the center. The nebula's main ring structure is about a light-year across. Mona Evans, “Nebulae” http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art43407.asp

Supermassive Black Hole in a "Small" Galaxy, Stuart Rankin Edited Chandra Space Telescope image of the Whirlpool Galaxy

~~Black Holes Have Simple Feeding Habits (NASA, Chandra) ~ supermassive black hole is about 70 million times more massive than the Sun by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center~~

Celestial Fireworks - Hubble by Deep Space Photography - Resembling the puffs of smoke and sparks from a summer fireworks display in this image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, these delicate filaments are actually sheets of debris from a stellar explosion in a neighboring galaxy.

NGC 2068 (a/k/a Messier 78) | Image Credit: ESO/APEX (MPIfR/ESO/OSO)/T. Stanke et al./Igor Chekalin/Digitized Sky Survey 2

wordlessTechfrom wordlessTech

The Black Widow Pulsar

The “Black Widow” pulsar is moving through the galaxy at a speed of almost a million kilometers per hour. A bow shock wave due to this motion is visible to optical telescopes, shown in this image as the greenish crescent shape. The pressure behind the bow shock creates a second shock wave that sweeps the cloud of high-energy particles back from the pulsar to form the cocoon.