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Mona Evans
Mona Evans • 1 year ago

Perseus Cluster’s X-Ray Skull. [Credit: A. Fabian (IoA Cambridge) et al., NASA] Although it looks like something in torment, it’s just an X-Ray image of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies. It doesn’t show the galaxies, only the X-rays given out by the gas between the galaxies. Mona Evans, "Cosmic Halloween Tour" www.bellaonline.c...

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