Discover and save creative ideas

    DR 6 nebula ("Galactic Ghoul"). This is a star-forming region in the constellation Cygnus, with the central region (the "nose") about 3.5 light years across. The nebula's nickname comes from its resemblance to a ghoulish face, with cavities in the cloud looking rather like two eyes and a devouring mouth. (Credit: S. Carey (Caltech), JPL-Caltech, NASA) Mona Evans, "Cosmic Ghosts Ghouls and Vampires" www.bellaonline.c...

    2y

    8 comments

    • Diomalco Last Name

      A monster lurking behind a blanket of cosmic dust is unveiled in this 2004 Halloween image from Nasa's Spitzer Space Telescope. Resembling a ghoul with two hollow eyes and a screaming mouth, this cloud of newborn stars was uncovered by Spitzer's heat-seeking infrared eyes. Picture: NASA/JPL-Caltech/S.Carey/REX

    • Andrea Eskuche

      DR 6 nebula (The Galactic Ghoul) is a star forming cloud of gas and dust located some 3,900 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus. The center (or “nose”) of the nebula is roughly 3.5 light-years long and contains a cluster of about 10 massive newborn stars, ranging in size from 10 to 20 times the mass of our Sun. - Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/S.Carey (Caltech)

    • Mona Evans

      DR 6 nebula ("Galactic Ghoul"). This is a star-forming region in the constellation Cygnus, with the central region (the "nose") about 3.5 light years across. The nebula's nickname comes from its resemblance to a ghoulish face, with cavities in the cloud looking rather like two eyes and a devouring mouth. (Credit: S. Carey (Caltech), JPL-Caltech, NASA)

    • Mick Gill

      this cloud of newborn stars was uncovered by Spitzer's heat-seeking infrared eyes

    • Glenn Sermos

      Stock Photos: Nebula gas cloud in deep outer space

    • Nathalie Froget

      The Galactic Ghoul, a spooky cloud in Cygnus

    • Susana Lara

      Galactic Ghoul' Rears Its Spooky Head

    • Grace McCall

      Cloud of Newborn Stars

    People also love

    What powers the Heart Nebula? The large emission nebula dubbed IC 1805 looks, in whole, like a human heart. The nebula glows brightly in red light emitted by its most prominent element: hydrogen. The red glow and the larger shape are all created by a small group of stars near the nebula's center. A close up spanning about 30 light years contains many of these stars is shown above in a recent image taken by the Canada France Hawaii Telescope. apod.nasa.gov/...

    Little Ghost Nebula. (NGC 6369) (Credit: Hubble Heritage Team, NASA) A planetary nebula in the constellation Ophiucus over 2000 light years away. William Herschel discovered it in the18th century. It's round like a planet, but was actually formed from material ejected by a dying star. What remains of the star is the white dwarf near the center. The nebula's main ring structure is about a light-year across. Mona Evans, “Nebulae” www.bellaonline.c...

    Witch's Broom Nebula. It's part of the Veil Nebula (NGC 6960), the remains of a supernova that exploded more than 15,000 years ago. The bright star (52 Cygnus) near the center of the image isn't associated with the supernova. (Credit: T. A. Rector / University of Alaska Anchorage and WIYN /NOAO/AURA/NSF) Mona Evans, "Cosmic Halloween Tour" www.bellaonline.c...

    A grinning one-eyed skull? Actually it's NGC 5189, a complex planetary nebula around a dying star. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/S.Carey (Caltech)) Mona Evans, "Cosmic Halloween Tour" www.bellaonline.c...

    A photogenic group of nebulae can be found in Chamaeleon, a constellation visible predominantly in skies south of the Earth's equator. Towards Chamaeleon, dark molecular clouds and bright planetary nebula NGC 3195 can be found. Visible near the center of the above photograph is a reflection nebula surrounding a young bright star. On the lower right, a dark molecular cloud blocks the light from stars behind it.

    The Stingray Nebula. Stingray's emerging bubbles and rings of shocked and ionized gas. The gas is energized by the hot central star as it nears the end of its life, evolving toward a final white dwarf phase. The image also shows a companion star (at about 10 o'clock) within the nebula. Astronomers suspect that such companions account for the complex shapes and rings of this and many other planetary nebulae. This cosmic infant is about 130 times the size of our own solar system and growing.

    One of the most identifiable nebulae in the sky, the Horsehead Nebula in Orion, is part of a large, dark, molecular cloud. Also known as Barnard 33, the unusual shape was first discovered on a photographic plate in the late 1800s. The red glow originates from hydrogen gas predominantly behind the nebula, ionized by the nearby bright star Sigma Orionis. The darkness of the Horsehead is caused mostly by thick dust, although the lower part of the Horsehead's neck casts a shadow to the left.

    The Ghost Nebula (vdB 141). It's a reflection nebula in the constellation Cepheus. The light of stars embedded in the nebula give it the brown color that looks a bit liked dried blood. (Image credit: T.A. Rector/University of Alaska Anchorage, H. Schweiker/WIYN and NOAO/AURA/NSF) Mona Evans, "Cosmic Halloween Tour" www.bellaonline.c...

    How did this nebula get created? The Cocoon Nebula, cataloged as IC 5146, is a strikingly beautiful nebula located about 4,000 light years away toward the constellation of Cygnus. Inside the Cocoon is a newly developing open cluster of stars. Like other stellar nurseries, the Cocoon Nebula is, at the same time, an emission nebula, a reflection nebula, and an absorption nebula. apod.nasa.gov/...

    The Pelican Nebula (IC 5067/5070) an H II region associated with the North America Nebula in the constellation Cygnus, by Don Bryden #summerstargazing

    Baby stars are forming near the eastern rim of the cosmic cloud Perseus in this infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The baby stars are approximately three million years old and are shown as reddish-pink dots to the right of the image.

    Cotton Candy Nebula - The nebula known as N11, complete with sparkly star clusters embedded in fluffy pink clouds of gas. This exceptionally energetic star-forming region, also known as the Bean Nebula, extends over 1,000 light-years in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Three generations of star formation have created shells of gas and dust which are being blown away by radiation from the newborn stars.

    This looks more like a threatening ghost than either the dear old Horsehead Nebula or anything to do with the Fourth! But it's a Hubble Space Telescope infrared image of the Horsehead Nebula. (Credit: STScI/AURA/ESA/NASA) Mona Evans, "Cosmic Halloween Tour" www.bellaonline.c...

    Moon with saturn occulation behind taken by Nasa's LRO

    Wolf-Rayet Bubble Nebula

    Perseus Cluster’s X-Ray Skull. [Credit: A. Fabian (IoA Cambridge) et al., NASA] Although it looks like something in torment, it’s just an X-Ray image of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies. It doesn’t show the galaxies, only the X-rays given out by the gas between the galaxies. Mona Evans, "Cosmic Halloween Tour" www.bellaonline.c...

    Witch Head Nebula (IC 2118). It's reflection nebula which glows by reflecting light from the bright blue star Rigel in the constellation Orion. The nebular dust grains tend to absorb red light and reflect blue light. (Image credit: Steve Mazlin, Star Shadows Remote Observatory) Mona Evans, "Cosmic Halloween Tour" www.bellaonline.c...

    Reflection nebula in Cepheus cataloged as vdB 152. It's often described as a "ghostly apparition" and the picture shows it looking like the common image of a ghost. (Image credit: Giovanni Benentende) Mona Evans, "Cosmic Halloween Tour" www.bellaonline.c...

    Ghostly Reflections in the Pleiades. (Image Credit: NASA & The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)) One of the hot stars of the Pleiades cluster is destroying a dark cloud of gas and dust. That's producing this wispy specter. The blue color shows that it's reflecting starlight. Mona Evans, "Cosmic Halloween Tour" www.bellaonline.c...