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    Young astronomer Laurent V. Joli-Coeur captured a shadow cast by Jupiter. The arrows point to the faint hammer-shaped gnomon of his "Jupiterdial". The 15-year-old was the first person to photograph a shadow cast by our largest planet.

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    • Mona Evans

      Young astronomer Laurent V. Joli-Coeur captured a shadow cast by Jupiter. The arrows point to the faint hammer-shaped gnomon of his "Jupiterdial". The 15-year-old was the first person to photograph a shadow cast by our largest planet.

    • Mona Evans

      Young astronomer captures a shadow cast by Jupiter : Bad Astronomy. The hammer-shaped shadow is from his gnomon, and the light source is from Jupiter. To make sure, he rotated the rig a bit, and the shadow moved as well, indicating it was from a point source. Also, he pointed his rig well away from Jupiter and got no shadow when he took a third picture, showing it wasn’t from the glow of the night sky, either.

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