Discover all the things that inspire you
You can also sign in with

You might also like pins from these topics

Sun

Soho

Image

Thanksgiving

There's more Gardening Pins to see...
Come take a look at what else is here!
He used Pinterest to start his rooftop oasis
Join Pinterest to find (and save!) all the things that inspire you.
Creating an account means you’re okay with Pinterest's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.
50+
billion Pins
to explore
15
seconds to
sign up (free!)
Visit site
  • Jofre Maruny

    WIRED Space Photo of the Day: ISON’s Big Day

  • S Eckl Witzke

    Comet ISON Streams Toward the Sun | NASA In the early hours of Nov. 27, 2013, Comet ISON entered the field of view of the European Space Agency/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. In this picture, called a coronagraph, the bright light of the sun itself is blocked so the structures around it are visible. Comet ISON, which began its trip from the Oort cloud region of our solar system, will reach its closest approach to the sun on Thanksgiving Day, skimming just 730,000 miles above the sun.

Related Pins

Bright, brighter, brightest: these views of Comet ISON after its closest approach to the sun Nov. 28 show that a small part of the nucleus may have survived the encounter. Images from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Credit: ESA/NASA/SOHO/GSFC

SIGNS IN THE HEAVENS: Two comets racing towards Earth and Sun: ‘unprecedented’ | END TIME HEADLINES

Transit of Venus from 2004 || Image Credit & Copyright: David Cortner ||

This movie shows Comet ISON orbiting around the sun – represented by the white circle -- on Nov. 28, 2013. ISON looks smaller as it streams away, but scientists believe its nucleus may still be intact. The video covers Nov. 27, 2013, 3:30 p.m. EST to Nov. 29, 2013, 8:30 a.m. EST.

What is a Sungrazing Comet? | Sungrazing comets are a special class of comets that come very close to the sun at their nearest approach, a point called perihelion. To be considered a sungrazer, a comet needs to get within about 850,000 miles from the sun at perihelion. Many come even closer, even to within a few thousand miles.

A small nucleus may still be intact as Comet ISON makes its way around the Sun. [NASA/ESA/SOHO/GSFC]

A view of Earth as seen from the Cupola on Earth-facing side of the International Space Station. Visible in the top left foreground is a Russian Soyuz crew capsule. In the lower right corner, a solar array panel can be seen.

An active region of the sun just rotating into the view of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory gives a profile view of coronal loops over about a two-day period, from Feb. 8-10, 2014. Coronal loops are found around sunspots and in active regions.

An M-class solar flare erupts from the right side of the sun in this image from shortly before midnight EST on Jan. 12, 2015. The image blends two wavelengths of light -- 171 and 304 angstroms -- as captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory.

Graceful Eruption A solar prominence began to bow out and the broke apart in a graceful, floating style in a little less than four hours (Mar. 16, 2013). The sequence was captured in extreme ultraviolet light. A large cloud of the particles appeared to hover further out above the surface before it faded away. Credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory/NASA