Rosette Nebula (NGC 2237). (Image: Adam Block & Tim Puckett) The red color is hydrogen gas energized by a hot star - it's an emission nebula. The “stem” is formed by a trail of the same glowing hydrogen gas. The nebula is 5000 light years away in the constellation Monoceros.Mona Evans "Monoceros the Unicorn" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art182324.asp

the rosette nebula

NGC 6888: The Crescent Nebula

The Horsehead Nebula 1500 light years away, it is a dark cloud that is visible only because of the lighter nebula behind it.

Emission nebula IC 1795 / NGC 896 in the constellation Cassiopeia

Star Formation in the Tarantula Nebula

In the Center of the Trifid Nebula (a star forming region toward the constellation of the Archer. In the center, the three prominent dust lanes that give the Trifid its name all come together. A single massive star near the center causes much of the glow).

5,000 light-years away... lies a Trifid #Nebula which looks somewhat like a heart.

Planetary nebulae can look simple, round, and planet-like in small telescopes. But images from the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope have become well known for showing these fluorescent gas shrouds of dying Sun-like stars to possess a staggering variety of detailed symmetries and shapes.

This photo from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope shows an ominous pillar of gas and dust known as the Cone Nebula. The image shows the top portion of the nebula that is 2.5 light years in height. The Cone Nebula is 2,500 light-years from Earth in the Monoceros constellation. The red halo of light seen around the pillar is caused when ultraviolet radiation causes hydrogen gas in the nebula to glow.

The Medusa Nebula -- "Braided, serpentine filaments of glowing gas suggest this nebula's popular name, The Medusa Nebula. Also known as Abell 21, this Medusa is an old planetary nebula some 1,500 light-years away in the constellation Gemini. Like its mythological namesake, the nebula is associated with a dramatic transformation. The planetary nebula phase represents a final stage... as they transform themselves from red giants to hot white dwarf stars..."

Great Orion Nebulae - "...also known as M42..."

The Ring Nebula (M57). The central ring of the Ring Nebula is about one light-year across and 2,000 light-years away. This image was taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: NASA.

NGC 7635: The Bubble Nebula

NGC 6302 (The Butterfly Nebula): With an estimated surface temperature of about 250,000 degrees C, the central star of this particular planetary nebula is exceptionally hot -- shining brightly in ultraviolet light but hidden from direct view by a dense torus of dust. This dramatically detailed close-up of the dying star's nebula was recorded by the newly upgraded Hubble Space Telescope. Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team

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Wolf-Rayet Star 124: Stellar Wind Machine Image Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA

In 1995, a now famous picture from the Hubble Space Telescope featured Pillars of Creation, star forming columns of cold gas and dust light-years long inside M16, the Eagle Nebula. This remarkable false-color composite image revisits the nearby stellar nursery with image data from the orbiting Herschel Space Observatory and XMM-Newton telescopes. Herschel's far infrared detectors record the emission from the region's cold dust directly, including the famous pillars and other structures near ...

Narrow band filters and a false-color palette give these three nebulae a stunning appearance against the cosmic canvas of the central Milky Way. All three are stellar nurseries about 5,000 light-years or so distant, toward the nebula rich constellation Sagittarius. In the 18th century, astronomer Charles Messier cataloged two of them; colorful M8, above and right of center, and compact M20 at the left. The third, NGC 6559, is at bottom right.

This photo from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope shows an ominous pillar of gas and dust known as the Cone Nebula. The image shows the top portion of the nebula that is 2.5 light years in height. The Cone Nebula is 2,500 light-years from Earth in the Monoceros constellation. The red halo of light seen around the pillar is caused when ultraviolet radiation causes hydrogen gas in the nebula to glow.

NGC 6188 is an emission nebula located about 4,000 light years away in the constellation Ara. The bright open cluster NGC 6193, visible to the naked eye, is responsible for a region of reflection nebulosity within NGC 6188.