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Gemini. You can see why Gemini is sometimes described as "over Orion's left shoulder." This map shows Castor and Pollux, Mekbuda, NGC 2392 and M35, among other features of Gemini. Mona Evans, "Gemini - the Celestial Twins" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art182821.asp

The constellation Gemini the Twins represents the brothers, Castor and Pollux, in an embrace. (Created with Stellarium) Mona Evans, "Gemini - the Celestial Twins" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art182821.asp

Cancer the crab. This is an unaided-eye view of Cancer low in the sky. The two bright stars are Gemini's Castor and Pollux. It's difficult to pick out the Y of Cancer, so there are lines here to show the shape of the constellation. Mona Evans, "Cancer the Crab" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art300306.asp

In the skylore, and in the real sky, Scorpius (left) and Orion (right) are never seen in the sky at the same time. (Illustration from a project by Hyaku at behance .net) Mona Evans, "Scorpius the Scorpion", http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art301069.asp

GEMINI THE TWINS. Zodiac Building, Bucharest. And an astropoem: Two beautiful stars / and the Geminid meteor shower / which annually announces that / Castor and Pollux / have remained Olympic champions / in the heavens. (Image & poem: Andrei Dorian Gheorghe) Mona Evans, "Gemini - the Celestial Twins" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art182821.asp

A horse flies through the sky on feathered wings in late summer and early fall. This celestial horse is the mythical steed Pegasus - although you will find only its front half in the sky, as its hind quarters are cut off where the neighboring figure of Andromeda begins. (drawing: Bruno Tomba) ©Mona Evans,"Pegasus the Winged Horse" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art24050.asp

Cancer the crab. This is an unaided-eye view of Cancer low in the sky. The two bright stars are Gemini's Castor and Pollux. It's difficult to pick out the Y of Cancer. The next pin shows the dots joined. Or if you click on the image, a mouseover will show it. Mona Evans, "Cancer the Crab" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art300306.asp

Norma, shown under the name Norma et Regula (set square and ruler) in the Uranographia of Johann Bode (1801). One of the constellations of Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille. Mona Evans, “Lacaille's Skies – Arts” http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art184008.asp

Perseus. This constellation is shaped rather like a distorted capital A. In the sky he is depicted holding the severed head of Medusa the Gorgon, marked by the star Algol. (Credit: IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott & Rick Fienberg)) Mona Evans, "Absolute Beginners - Autumn Skies" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art27364.asp

See the Teapot of Sagittarius in this photo? It comes from EarthSky Facebook friend Lewistown StormWatcher, who posted it on August 17, 2012. The center of the galaxy is located in this direction. Mona Evans, "Sagittarius the Archer" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art300844.asp