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The rough-riding talents of Lulu Parr were not first seen at Buffalo Bill’s Wild West. Her skill with the gun caught the attention of Pawnee Bill, who signed her to his show in 1903. She left that show but came back in 1911. By that time, Pawnee Bill had joined Buffalo Bill’s show. Buffalo Bill was so in awe of Lulu’s willingness to ride unbroken ponies that he presented her with an ivory-handled Colt single-action revolver, engraved with “Buffalo Bill Cody to Lulu Parr—1911.”

portrait of Amos Two Bulls, a Sioux Brave. The picture was taken in 1900. By this time, the traditional Indian lifestyle had pretty much come to an end. Most were living on reservations at this point. Amos Two Bulls was a member of the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show.