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PAZUZU, the Assyrian/Babylonian evil underworld demon 1,000 BC with dog-like face, scaly torso, snake-headed penis, talons of a bird and wings, but who counteracted Lamashtu who stole babies from their mother's womb or when newly born, by forcing her back to the netherworld, so Pazuzu was sometimes hung out of the window or around necks of pregnant women as an amulet

PAZUZU, the Assyrian/Babylonian evil underworld demon 1,000 BC with dog-like face, scaly torso, snake-headed penis, talons of a bird and wings, but who counteracted Lamashtu who stole babies from their mother's womb or when newly born, by forcing her back to the netherworld, so Pazuzu was sometimes hung out of the window or around necks of pregnant women as an amulet

Pazuzu is the Assyrian king of the demons of the wind. Though an evil spirit himself, he wards off many other evil spirits so was thought to be beneficial to mankind. The original was made to resemble a common representation of the demon, such as the one in the Louvre. Pazuzu has a dog-like head, human body, wings, eagle-talon feet and snake penis.

Pazuzu is the Assyrian king of the demons of the wind. Though an evil spirit himself, he wards off many other evil spirits so was thought to be beneficial to mankind. The original was made to resemble a common representation of the demon, such as the one in the Louvre. Pazuzu has a dog-like head, human body, wings, eagle-talon feet and snake penis.

Bronze head of Pazuzu. Assyrian, 799–600 B.C. Bronze. H 10.5 cm, W 7.2 cm, D 6 cm. ME 132964. The Trustees of the British Museum.

Bronze head of Pazuzu. Assyrian, 799–600 B.C. Bronze. H 10.5 cm, W 7.2 cm, D 6 cm. ME 132964. The Trustees of the British Museum.

Assyrian Brown Faience Head of Pazuzu Assyrian Empire; 900-700 BC; Height 1.8 inches The rare brown faience Pazuzu head shows the demon with most of his usual features. He is the best known male evil spirit associated with the spread of disease. Pazuzu heads were commonly used to shield pregnant women and infants from illness. In addition to its protective function, it may have been a seal. A star is engraved on the bottom surface of the neck.

Assyrian Brown Faience Head of Pazuzu Assyrian Empire; 900-700 BC; Height 1.8 inches The rare brown faience Pazuzu head shows the demon with most of his usual features. He is the best known male evil spirit associated with the spread of disease. Pazuzu heads were commonly used to shield pregnant women and infants from illness. In addition to its protective function, it may have been a seal. A star is engraved on the bottom surface of the neck.

In Assyrian and Babylonian mythology, Pazuzu was the king of the demons of the wind, and son of the god Hanbi. He also represented the southwestern wind, the bearer of storms and drought.

In Assyrian and Babylonian mythology, Pazuzu was the king of the demons of the wind, and son of the god Hanbi. He also represented the southwestern wind, the bearer of storms and drought.

Bronze Amulet, Neo-Assyrian, c. 800-600 BC, Iraq This head was probably suspended close to a woman in labour, for protection against the female demon Lamashtu. A ‘bronze Pazuzu’, presumably an amulet much smaller than this, is prescribed to be worn for this purpose, and a stone Pazuzu is reported to have been part of a necklace found within a grave. When applied to clothes, bronze fibulae - brooch-like safety-pins - bearing the head of Pazuzu probably protected mother and baby.

Bronze Amulet, Neo-Assyrian, c. 800-600 BC, Iraq This head was probably suspended close to a woman in labour, for protection against the female demon Lamashtu. A ‘bronze Pazuzu’, presumably an amulet much smaller than this, is prescribed to be worn for this purpose, and a stone Pazuzu is reported to have been part of a necklace found within a grave. When applied to clothes, bronze fibulae - brooch-like safety-pins - bearing the head of Pazuzu probably protected mother and baby.

The demon Pazuzu. British museum, London

The demon Pazuzu. British museum, London

Aztec Three Faced Mask. c1300AD. "The three faces depict three phases in which human time.. The central face is jovial and full of the vigor of youth, referring to the time when individuals are during their most productive in a society. The exterior mask has closed eyes, alluding to the opposite phase, death. In between is a period of no less importance, the state that arrives with experience: old age."

Aztec Three Faced Mask. c1300AD. "The three faces depict three phases in which human time.. The central face is jovial and full of the vigor of youth, referring to the time when individuals are during their most productive in a society. The exterior mask has closed eyes, alluding to the opposite phase, death. In between is a period of no less importance, the state that arrives with experience: old age."

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