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    Artifact Statues of Susa Noblemen doing the Ancient Persian Susian Salute. The right hand bent straight, with the elbow to the waistline and the hand held up sideways. The left hand held in front of the body as the show of respect. This salute was even in use during Achaemenid Era. The Ancient Persian Susian Salute is the oldest Persian Salute. During Achaemenids Era, the salute was given with the hand a bit tilted

    Ancient Persian Susian Salute Artifact Statues of Parthian Arsacid Princess doing The right hand bent straight, with the elbow to the waistline and the hand held up sideways. The left hand held in front of the body as the show of respect. This Salute is the origin of the Ancient Persian Aryan Salute of the later years during Achaemenids and after eras. Ancient Persian Susian Salute was in use during Susian, Median and Achaemenid Eras.

    Ancient Persian Susian Salute Artifact Statues of Susa Noblemen doing the Ancient Persian Susian Salute. The right hand bent straight, with the elbow to the waistline and the hand held up sideways. The left hand held in front of the body as the show of respect. This Salute is the origin of the Ancient Persian Aryan Salute of the later years during Achaemenids and after eras. Ancient Persian Susian Salute was in use during Susian, Median and Achaemenid Eras.

    Ancient Egyptian Limestone Statue of Bes.

    UV light shows how the Ancient Greek statues painted their sculptures

    Statue, Wadjet (?) Late Period Dynasty: Dynasty 25–26 ca. 712–525 B.C. Egypt Bronze or copper

    ETRUSCANS TRACED THEIR ANCESTRY TO URUK ANYWAY......Sumerian Male Votive Statue

    Etruscan armored warriors, one with feathered ridge helmet and gorgonion breastplate and priestly skirt

    Sumer. Carved Sedimentary Stone Votive Statue of a Man, H. 23 cm. Late Sumerian, ca 2000 BC. Much of Sumerian sculpture was used as ritual works for temples.  Many of them were created in stone for durability, so that the owner of the portrait statue could continue their worship beyond their deaths.  It was common for prayers to be inscribed in cuneiform on the work that dedicated it to a specific god.  These statues were meant to pray in place of the owner

    Queen Ahmose Nefertati

    Statue of Assyrian king Shalmaneser III

    Akhenaton, from the Temple of Aton, Karnak, Egypt, Dynasty XVIII ca 1353-1335 bce

    Pharaoh King Menkaure , builder of the great third pyramid of Giza

    Idi-ilum, Sumerian, Govenor of Lagash.

    Statue of a seated Parthian Princess discovered from Hatra; Hatrâ was a strongly fortified ancient Iranian Parthian city in Upper Mesopotamia (today's northern Iraq). This magnificent statue is now kept in Baghdad museum. (photo with special thanks to CAIS website)

    The identity of Sassanian kings was rarely annotated on their artifacts. But, they all used different crown designs. So modern researchers must identify them via their crown design. This statue can be identified as belonging to King Peroz I, because of the vertical crescent on his crown. AD 240

    Tang Dynasty Art

    Equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, 175 A.D. Musei Capitolini, Rome.

    Joan of Arc!

    Etruscan Minerva bronze statue, 7th cent. BCE

    The Library of Celsus in Ephesus was built in 117 A.D as a tomb for Gaius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus, the governor of the province of Asia. The capacity of the library was more than 12,000 scrolls. It was the third richest library in ancient times after the ones in Alexandria and Pergamum.