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  • Danika Barr

    Swim in Jellyfish Lake in Palau. The lake was originally part of the ocean, but it was closed off and, over time, the jellyfish have lost the power to sting>>> Here's another for the bucket list! I am so scared of jelly fish this would help me I think

  • [H]

    Palau, Time to go: JANUARY Snorkelling in Jellyfish Lake, Rock Islands & Ngemelis Wall & Blue Corner Palau Photos - Featured Images of Palau, South Pacific - TripAdvisor

  • Kelsea Lee

    Bucket List: Swim in Jellyfish Lake (Palau).

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Jellyfish Lake, Republic of Palau, Micronesia. The jellyfish evolved in the lake without any predators, and over time grew vegetarian and lost their ability to sting. Their red color is a result of an algae diet. The water in the lake is salty and connected underground to the ocean but not even the tiniest jellyfish can get in or out.

At Jellyfish Lake in the Pacific island of Palau, it's safe to swim among millions of jellyfish, because the sometimes-deadly creatures have lost their sting. Someday I'll go here!

Jellyfish Lake, Republic of Palau, Micronesia. The jellyfish evolved in the lake without any predators, and over time grew vegetarian and lost their ability to sting.

Jellyfish Lake in Palau - one of the top diving destinations in the world. The jellyfish that live have lost their sting and are completely harmless making them the perfect swimming companions.

Sleeping on the ocean floor… This would be wonderful if my greatest fears weren't claustrophobia and drowning.

Palau’s Jellyfish Lake once had an outlet to the sea, but is now connected to the ocean through fissures and tunnels in the surrounding limestone. Millions of jellyfish were trapped in the basin when sea levels dropped, and over time they evolved into a species that have lost the ability to sting because they don’t have to fight off predators. Jellyfish Lake is a snorkeling and swimming extravaganza where you can get up close and personal with an estimated 10 million Jellyfish.

Sand Harbor State Park, Lake Tahoe, California, United States.

Jellyfish Lake, Republic of Palau, Micronesia. The jellyfish evolved in the lake without any predators, and over time grew vegetarian and lost their ability to sting.

Palau’s Jellyfish Lake once had an outlet to the sea, but is now connected to the ocean through fissures and tunnels in the surrounding limestone. Millions of jellyfish were trapped in the basin when sea levels dropped, and over time they evolved into a species that have lost the ability to sting because they don’t have to fight off predators. Jellyfish Lake is a snorkeling and swimming extravaganza where you can get up close and personal with an estimated 10 million jellyfish.

Lake Louise Banff National Park by kevin mcneal, via Flickr