Katrina Harrington was in seventh grade at South Junior High in Brockton, Massachusetts when she started having trouble at school. Like most girls her age, Trina wore skirts and hair accessories, and started wearing makeup. But unlike other students, she was disciplined for how she dressed. By eighth grade Trina had to have her clothing approved every morning by the school’s principal; if he didn’t approve, he sent her home. Eventually, Trina stopped going to school altogether.

Katrina Harrington was in seventh grade at South Junior High in Brockton, Massachusetts when she started having trouble at school. Like most girls her age, Trina wore skirts and hair accessories, and started wearing makeup. But unlike other students, she was disciplined for how she dressed. By eighth grade Trina had to have her clothing approved every morning by the school’s principal; if he didn’t approve, he sent her home. Eventually, Trina stopped going to school altogether.

Don Babets and David Jean in 1985 thought they were finally on their way to having the family they wanted. Two brothers—a toddler and a baby—came to live with them through the state’s foster care system. But soon after the placement The Boston Globe published an article about “community opposition” to their growing family, and the Department of Social Services (DSS) removed the boys from their home. DSS announced a new policy that all but banned gays and lesbians from becoming foster…

Don Babets and David Jean in 1985 thought they were finally on their way to having the family they wanted. Two brothers—a toddler and a baby—came to live with them through the state’s foster care system. But soon after the placement The Boston Globe published an article about “community opposition” to their growing family, and the Department of Social Services (DSS) removed the boys from their home. DSS announced a new policy that all but banned gays and lesbians from becoming foster…

In 1990, The Boy Scouts of America publicly expelled a former Eagle Scout named James Dale when leadership learned Dale is gay. To Scout leadership, Dale's sexual orientation meant that, among other things, he could not fulfill a core component of the Boy Scout oath. As a gay man, Dale couldn't be "morally clean and straight."

In 1990, The Boy Scouts of America publicly expelled a former Eagle Scout named James Dale when leadership learned Dale is gay. To Scout leadership, Dale's sexual orientation meant that, among other things, he could not fulfill a core component of the Boy Scout oath. As a gay man, Dale couldn't be "morally clean and straight."

The morning of September 11, 2001, after Nancy Walsh saw the news, after she ran to the refrigerator to check the flight itinerary her partner Carol Flyzik had left there, after she confirmed that Carol was scheduled to be on American Airlines Flight 11, she called the airline. They wouldn't confirm her partners tragic death because she was not family. GLAD applied for and won for Nancy compensation from the federal September 11 Victim Compensation Fund and also helped with other probate…

The morning of September 11, 2001, after Nancy Walsh saw the news, after she ran to the refrigerator to check the flight itinerary her partner Carol Flyzik had left there, after she confirmed that Carol was scheduled to be on American Airlines Flight 11, she called the airline. They wouldn't confirm her partners tragic death because she was not family. GLAD applied for and won for Nancy compensation from the federal September 11 Victim Compensation Fund and also helped with other probate…

By the time the case reached the U.S. Supreme Court in early 1995, GLAD and GLIB had won in court seven consecutive times. Each time a Massachusetts court affirmed the right of LGB Irish-Americans to participate in a public, civic event celebrating their heritage.    But-reframing GLIB's fight against discrimination as a First Amendment issue-the U.S. Supreme Court in June 1995 reversed the Massachusetts courts. (John "Wacko" Hurley (center) with the Allied War Veterans Council's attorneys.)

By the time the case reached the U.S. Supreme Court in early 1995, GLAD and GLIB had won in court seven consecutive times. Each time a Massachusetts court affirmed the right of LGB Irish-Americans to participate in a public, civic event celebrating their heritage. But-reframing GLIB's fight against discrimination as a First Amendment issue-the U.S. Supreme Court in June 1995 reversed the Massachusetts courts. (John "Wacko" Hurley (center) with the Allied War Veterans Council's attorneys.)

The Irish American Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Group of Boston in 1992 registered to march in the St. Patrick's Day parade, an event co-sponsored by the City of Boston and the South Boston Allied War Veterans Council. The Veterans' Council-headed by Korean War veteran John Hurley-rejected the group's registration on the grounds that GLIB posed a "safety concern." The group in '92 and '93 won court orders to march. Rather than let GLIB march in '94, the Veterans Council canceled the parade.

The Irish American Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Group of Boston in 1992 registered to march in the St. Patrick's Day parade, an event co-sponsored by the City of Boston and the South Boston Allied War Veterans Council. The Veterans' Council-headed by Korean War veteran John Hurley-rejected the group's registration on the grounds that GLIB posed a "safety concern." The group in '92 and '93 won court orders to march. Rather than let GLIB march in '94, the Veterans Council canceled the parade.

GLAD’s 1995 case, Bragdon v. Abbott, established that people with HIV and AIDS are in fact protected by the ADA. Bragdon was the first ADA case ever heard by the U.S. Supreme Court, and the first involving HIV. It was the second Supreme Court case argued by an openly-gay attorney.    The case began in 1994 when Bangor, Maine dentist Randon Bragdon refused to treat Sidney Abbott in his office after she disclosed that she was HIV+. GLAD filed suit under the ADA in federal district court in…

GLAD’s 1995 case, Bragdon v. Abbott, established that people with HIV and AIDS are in fact protected by the ADA. Bragdon was the first ADA case ever heard by the U.S. Supreme Court, and the first involving HIV. It was the second Supreme Court case argued by an openly-gay attorney. The case began in 1994 when Bangor, Maine dentist Randon Bragdon refused to treat Sidney Abbott in his office after she disclosed that she was HIV+. GLAD filed suit under the ADA in federal district court in…

The court in 2000 ruled that that transgender students need the same support and protection that other students need, and that “exposing children to diversity at an early age serves the important social goals of increasing their ability to tolerate differences” and teaches “respect for everyone’s unique personal experience.”

The court in 2000 ruled that that transgender students need the same support and protection that other students need, and that “exposing children to diversity at an early age serves the important social goals of increasing their ability to tolerate differences” and teaches “respect for everyone’s unique personal experience.”

In GLAD's 1993 case, Adoption of Susan and a companion case, Adoption of Tammy, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled that the unmarried partner of a child’s biological parent can adopt the child and become a second legal parent without the biological parent giving up his or her rights. The Plaintiff couple had been together for 13 years when in 1989 Maureen gave birth to their daughter Kate.

In GLAD's 1993 case, Adoption of Susan and a companion case, Adoption of Tammy, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled that the unmarried partner of a child’s biological parent can adopt the child and become a second legal parent without the biological parent giving up his or her rights. The Plaintiff couple had been together for 13 years when in 1989 Maureen gave birth to their daughter Kate.

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