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    Aviator Amy Johnson after her arrival in Brisbane 1930

    Dorothy Day with her prison dress. On November 1917 Day went to prison for being one of forty women in front of the White House protesting women's exclusion from the electorate. Arriving at a rural workhouse, the women were roughly handled. The women responded with a hunger strike. Finally they were freed by presidential order.

    Historic Newspapers~ The World dated 02/02/1890 -- New York World correspondent Nellie Bly circled the globe in record time: 72 days, 6 hours and 11 minutes. The trip, sponsored and arranged by the young female reporter's newspaper, retraced the journey of fictional character Phileas Fogg in Jules Verne's book "Around the World in Eighty Days." On exhibit in the News Corporation News History Gallery at the Newseum. Newseum collection Photo credit: Newseum collection

    World War l: American Red Cross Nurse ~

    From 1916 to 1957, Harvard College astronomer Margaret Harwood (1885-1979) directed the Maria Mitchell Observatory on Nantucket Island, and ran its female-founded and female-run nonprofit science education institute; she spent summers on the island doing research and conducting classes.

    Natalya Fyodorovna Meklin (born Kravtsova) -1922–2005 - was a much decorated World War II combat pilot in one of the three women-only Soviet air regiments. They were nicknamed the 'Night Witches' by their German opponents. Born in the Ukraine, in 1940 she joined the glider school at the Kiev Young Pioneer Palace. In 1942 when she was 19, she joined the Night Witches, piloting a Polikarpov Po-2 light bomber, and by the end of the war had flown 980 night missions.

    Hazel Carter dressed as a man to follow her soldier husband John overseas into WWI. She was sent home when the disguise was revealed. Hazel died in 1918, while John was still overseas.

    Battle Hymn of the Republic author, Julia Ward Howe (1819-1910) was born in New York City to Samuel Ward, Jr., a stockbroker, and Julia Rush, a poet who died of tuberculosis when Julia was five. Howe was educated at schools for young ladies and tutored at home until the age of 16. Her father died in 1839, and five years later Julia married Samuel Gridley Howe, head of the Perkins Institute for the Blind. The couple had six children, the last of whom was born in 1859.

    Tererai Trent, PhD, is a Zimbabwean-American woman who was not allowed to go to school as a child because she was female. Tererai was forced to marry at age 11. By age 18, she was the mother of three. "When my husband realized that I wanted to have an education, he would beat me." In 2009, happily remarried Trent earned her doctorate; her thesis looked at HIV/AIDS prevention programs for women and girls in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Women of World War II Memorial on Whitehall Drive, via Flickr.