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Llamasu!!! My very favorite piece of art. in the whole wide world. and it's here in Chicago! Oriental Institute. University of Chicago. #Mesopotamia #archaeology #museums

MALE AND FEMALE STATUES Gypsum Early Dynastic period (ca. 2750-2500 B.C.) Iraq, Diyala Region #Sumerian

Capital of a column from the audience hall of the palace of Darius I, Susa, c. 510 B.C.E. - YouTube. Audience Hall (apadana) of Darius and Xerxes. Persepolis, Iran. Persian. c. 520–465 B.C.E. Limestone.

Double Bull Capital on Fluted Column Persepolis, Apadana Limestone Achaemenid Period Reigns of Darius I and Xerxes 522-465 BCE

The Apadana (Audience Hall) of Darius and Xerxes. Persepolis. It could contain hundreds and maybe thousands of people at the same time. It was the largest building in Persepolis. The seventy-two columns which supported the roof were twenty-five meters high. The founding inscription reads: Darius the great king, king of kings, king of countries, son of Hystaspes, an Achaemenian, built this palace.

The higher part of a column from Apadana of Persepolis, Iran.

30. Audience Hall (apadana) of Darius and Xerxes. Persepolis, Iran. Persian. c. 520-465 B.C.E. Limestone. Stairway.

30. Audience Hall (apadana) of Darius and Xerxes. Persepolis, Iran. Persian. c. 520-465 B.C.E. Limestone.

Double Bull Iran,Persepolis,Apadana Reigns of Darius and Xerxes,522-465 BC

Palmyra. Re-used inscription built into the wall of the staircase within the headquarters building of the Camp of Diocletian. The inscription is on its side and has been re-oriented accordingly. Procillianus was governor of Phoenicia in AD 207.

An 5th C BC inscription in three languages by Xerxes the Great praising Athuramazda, the greatest of their gods, can be found on a smoothed section of the rock face, some 60 feet above the ground near the Fortress of Van in Turkey. The niche was originally carved out by Xerxes' father King Darius, but he left the surface blank. The inscription survives in near perfect condition and is divided into three columns of 27 lines written in Old Persian,

The Tripylon ("triple gate") of Persepolis can be found between the Apadana and the Hall of Hundred Columns.