Apadana audience hall of Darius and Xerxes, c. 515 BCE. Note: Columns influenced by the Greeks. Begun by Darius and completed under Xerxes, Apadana served as a large audience hall for Darius. The work began in 515 BC and was completed 30 years later. It was the largest building of the complex, supported by numerous columns and lined on three sides with open porches. The palace had a grand hall in the shape of a square, each side 60m long with seventy-two columns, thirteen of which still…

Apadana audience hall of Darius and Xerxes, c. 515 BCE. Note: Columns influenced by the Greeks. Begun by Darius and completed under Xerxes, Apadana served as a large audience hall for Darius. The work began in 515 BC and was completed 30 years later. It was the largest building of the complex, supported by numerous columns and lined on three sides with open porches. The palace had a grand hall in the shape of a square, each side 60m long with seventy-two columns, thirteen of which still…

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon in Ninevah, Iraq | Sennacherib's palace complex and a garden featuring trees hanging in the air on terraces and plants suspended on arches. The gardens were built in a series of terraces, buit up like an amphitheatre, with a lake at the bottom. Water was bought to the city and surrounding areas via a 60 mile long canal. Evidence of this structure, 300ft wide and 60ft deep at some points, remains on the landscape and can be seen on photographs taken by US…

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon in Ninevah, Iraq | Sennacherib's palace complex and a garden featuring trees hanging in the air on terraces and plants suspended on arches. The gardens were built in a series of terraces, buit up like an amphitheatre, with a lake at the bottom. Water was bought to the city and surrounding areas via a 60 mile long canal. Evidence of this structure, 300ft wide and 60ft deep at some points, remains on the landscape and can be seen on photographs taken by US…

Relief of the Persian king Xerxes (485-465 BCE) in the doorway of his palace at Persepolis, modern-day Iran. The bearers of the parasol and the towel-and flywhisk symbolize the royalty and power of the monarch.    Photo courtesy and taken by Jona Lendering, via the Wiki Commons

Relief of the Persian king Xerxes (485-465 BCE) in the doorway of his palace at Persepolis, modern-day Iran. The bearers of the parasol and the towel-and flywhisk symbolize the royalty and power of the monarch. Photo courtesy and taken by Jona Lendering, via the Wiki Commons

Persepolis - the capital of the Persian Empire. It was sanctioned by Cyrus the Great.

Persepolis - the capital of the Persian Empire. It was sanctioned by Cyrus the Great.

Reconstrucción de la Sala Hipóstila de Persépolis. El otro espacio hipóstilo fue la Sala de las 100 Columnas, un salón del trono iniciado por Jerjes y teminado por Artajerjes, que se compuso de 10 filas de 10 columnas que sotenían un techo de 4.600m2 y precedido de un atrio columnado que ponía de manifiesto el modo en que los persas supieron captar la influencia de otros pueblos.

Reconstrucción de la Sala Hipóstila de Persépolis. El otro espacio hipóstilo fue la Sala de las 100 Columnas, un salón del trono iniciado por Jerjes y teminado por Artajerjes, que se compuso de 10 filas de 10 columnas que sotenían un techo de 4.600m2 y precedido de un atrio columnado que ponía de manifiesto el modo en que los persas supieron captar la influencia de otros pueblos.

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