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The Chapel of St Peter on the Wall, Bradwell-on-Sea, Essex, England. The Chapel is a Grade I listed building and among the oldest largely intact Christian church buildings in England still in regular use, dating from the 7th century. The Chapel is assumed to be that of "Ythanceaster" (Bede, Historia Ecclesiastica 3.22), originally constructed as an Anglo-Celtic Church for the East Saxons in AD 654 by St Cedd, astride the ruins of the abandoned Roman fort of Othona.

Ye Olde Cock Tavern, Fleet St, London

St John Baptist Church Royston Barnsley Yorkshire

Gosforth Cross is a more than 4 metres tall stone cross in the cemetery of St Marys church in the village of Gosforth in Cumbria, UK. During the Viking era the population was mostly Scandinavian in this area. The cross is decorated with relief pictures that seams to be from Scandinavian Viking mythology.

Lichfield, Staffordshire, is the only medieval English cathedral with three spires. Starting in 1085 and continuing through the 12th century, the original wooden Saxon church was replaced by a Norman cathedral made from stone, and this was in turn replaced by the present Gothic cathedral begun in 1195. It was completed by the building of the Lady Chapel in the 1330s.

The church of St. Hydroc - Lanhydrock | Cornwall

Church of St. Casimir’s, Krakow, Poland...I was baptized in St. Casimir's Catholic Church in Ohio. How cool is this?

St. John's, Escomb Saxon Church is one of the oldest Anglo-Saxon churches in England, located in Escomb, County Durham. Founded in c.670-675, much of the stone came from the nearby Roman Fort at Binchester. On the south wall is a 7th or early 8th Century sundial, and on the north wall is a reused Roman stone with the markings "LEG VI" (Sixth Legion) set upside down. Except for a brief period, it has been in continuous use since Anglo-Saxon times.

All Hallows by the Tower, on Byward Street near the edge of the City of London. It's the oldest church in the City; the original building dates back as far as 675 AD. | by Duncan, via Flickr.

A secret door ~ St Botolph's Church, Cambridge, UK. It rather reminds me of Narnia.

Anglo Saxon Cross base, St. Peter's Church, Heysham Village, Lancashire, England

St. Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London. There has been a church on this site since approximately 1100. The church was destroyed in 1941 during the London Blitz of WW2. The scarred and blackened walls of the old church remain and now surround a tranquil area designated as a peace garden. Very cool!