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"The Bewcastle Cross is an Anglo-Saxon cross which is still in its original position within the churchyard of St Cuthbert's church at Bewcastle, in the English county of Cumbria. The cross, which probably dates from the 7th or early 8th century, features reliefs and inscriptions in the runic alphabet. The head of the cross is missing but the remains are 14.5 feet (4.4 metres) high, and almost square in section (56 x 54 cm at the base). "

Bewcastle Cross, Cumbria. Now no more than a farm, church and rectory lying within the walls of a Roman fort, yet Bewcastle has this wonderful early cross. The cross head has been lost, but the shaft depicts carvings of Christian significance. You can still see Viking runes cut into the shaft and there is reference to Kynnniburga, the wife of King Aldfrith who reigned in Northumbria from 685 to 704. Nearest town is Carlisle.

The Chapel of St Peter on the Wall, Bradwell-on-Sea, Essex, England. The Chapel is a Grade I listed building and among the oldest largely intact Christian church buildings in England still in regular use, dating from the 7th century. The Chapel is assumed to be that of "Ythanceaster" (Bede, Historia Ecclesiastica 3.22), originally constructed as an Anglo-Celtic Church for the East Saxons in AD 654 by St Cedd, astride the ruins of the abandoned Roman fort of Othona.

7th-century-anglo-saxon-helmet. Sutton Hoo, near Woodbridge, in the English county of Suffolk, is the site of two 6th- and early 7th-century cemeteries. One contained an undisturbed ship burial including a wealth of Anglo-Saxon artefacts of outstanding art-historical and archaeological significance, now held in the British Museum in London. Info = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sutton_Hoo